Follow Us On Facebook


Home Journal of Nursing Publish Search Advertise With Us

Bookmark the RN Journal in your Favorites File for easy reference!



Journal of Nursing : Men

  • Mystery Diagnosis: Recognizing Serotonin Syndrome
    Wendy Blatchley
    Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a rare condition that is believed to be induced by ingestion of serotonergic medications, leading to an increased serotonin level. Although many medications are thought to be responsible, some of the more common are antidepressants and opioids. There are no definitive tests to confirm SS, therefore diagnosis is based on clinical findings and can be somewhat difficult. A triad of symptoms, neuromuscular hyperactivity, altered mental status, and autonomic hyperactivity, are considered the hallmark signs, but are not present in all cases. Symptoms can vary from mild and almost undetectable to severe and life threatening. Three diagnostic systems are currently utilized to assist with diagnosis if SS is suspected: the Hunter, Sternbach, and Radomski criteria. A diagnosis of SS should prompt discontinuation of the suspected offending agent. Increased awareness of this issue is needed, including symptoms and risk factors, so that the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) may promptly recognize and diagnosis this condition to avoid further complications. Completing a thorough history and physical, along with accurate medication reconciliation can assist the APRN in identifying high risk patients. While there is still so much about SS that remains unknown, current information and education on this issue will ensure the APRN is providing safe and high-quality care. Databases utilized were CINAHL, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. These databases provide access to numerous nursing, biomedical, and scientific journals and were useful in locating up-to-date, peer reviewed research on this subject.
  • What Can We Do to Promote Professional Socialization in Nursing?
    Author 1: Nancy Bellucci, PhD, MSN, RN, CNOR Author 2: Shakeeka Misher, DNP, RN, RNC-MNN, NE-BC
    Transitioning to a new work setting is challenging for many nurses regardless of the time spent in practice. Promoting professional socialization, through mentoring and precepting, helps to facilitate a smooth transition. Effective mentoring, using role play, reflective exercises, and debriefing, provides the transitioning nurse the opportunity to self-actualize his or her potential in the new work environment. The use of Benner’s Novice to Expert Theory and Duchscher's Stages of Transition Theory as a basis for mentorship enhances safety and quality in the provision of care.
  • Case Study: A Systematic Approach to Early Recognition and Treatment of Sepsis
    Madeleine Augier RN BSN
    The term sepsis is often misunderstood. The public and often healthcare workers are unaware of the severity and high mortality rates this infection process has upon the world. Sepsis has vague symptoms that make diagnosis difficult. Often, sepsis is diagnosed in the later stages, when more obvious yet severe symptoms occur. This case study discusses a female who presents to the emergency department with sepsis secondary to pneumonia. Over the course of three days, the patient’s health quickly deteriorates, demonstrating the rapid progression of sepsis. Clinical findings, such as vitals signs, lab abnormalities, and symptoms of sepsis are discussed. The term bundle of care is presented to educate the reader on the golden standard of care for treatment of sepsis. This case study intends to increase community awareness and education to health care providers as well as providing an evidenced-based treatment guideline. More education and raised awareness will help prevent a deadly yet treatable infectious process.
  • Ethical considerations for the mentally unwell in a global pandemic
    Anthony Ragnauth
    A case review on a mentally Ill patient during the covid pandemic.
  • Rapid Response Team to the Rescue
    Marina E. Bitanga BSN, RN, CCRN
    Rapid response team purpose is to initiate immediate measures before patient deteriorates further and to educate the staff on activating the staff the Rapid response team
  • New Innovation for Chronic Kidney Disease
    John Cope, RN Simmons College
    This body of work looks at new and innovative treatments that are being researched and developed for the treatment of chronic kidney disease.
  • Medical Equipment
    Stacey Kast Rn, Bsn, Cpan
    This article is about receiving a patient postop who required oxygen. The respiratory therapist had disconnected the oxygen and placed onto the beside portable O2 tank to administer a nebulizer treatment. After nebulizer treatment was completed the oxygen was not moved back to the wall and tank went empty. The patients oxygen dropped.
  • When "Old Dogs" go Back to School
    Mary Ellen Buechel Holbrook
    I went back to college at the age of 62. Being an "old dog", I was not computer savvy, so taking classes mostly on-line was quite challenging. I believe that my trials and triumphs evidenced in this article, will encourage nurses, especially older nurses, to go back to school for their BSN.
  • Do Nurses Need Biology?
    Rosemary Oh-McGinnis, PhD and Lynette Sigola, MBChB (Hons), PhD
    As Biology instructors for nursing students, it is an honour to contribute to laying down a foundation in Biology for future nurses. One common question that has emerged among nursing students is “Why do I need to know Biology if I’m going to become a nurse?” We have wrestled with this question for some time. How does one generate an appropriate response to this question? How does one instill within a student the passion for learning Biology? How can one emphasize how valuable understanding Biology will become in the workplace? We hope to raise some interesting discussion and awareness about a topic that we have spent countless hours deliberating amongst ourselves and our colleagues.
  • Bedside Reporting: Embracing the Need for Clinical Change
    Dr. Kelly Duffy, EdD, MSN, RN
    Communication is an integral part of nursing care. The implementation of bedside reporting practices provides an avenue for best practices and improved outcomes.
  • Women and Homelessness
    Grace Augustine, ARNP, Barry University
    Women and homelessness is a great concern that affects the global policy and health determinants to improve health. This case study is a glimpse of the cultural class as it revolves around the lives of mostly White homeless mothers, attending to both everyday lives and cultural norms while exploring and interpreting their interdependencies.
  • The Forgotten Arm of Care
    Hilda Pritchard Ming PhD Director Nursing Staff Development Division University Hospital of the West Indies Jamaica
    This article addresses the need for building a healthy work environment amidst the great emphasis on staffing to enhance care .
  • When Doing The Right Thing Leads to the Wrong Results
    Tracy Nelson-Bungert, RN, MSN
    Reprimanding nurses for medication errors contibutes to a culture of evasion and silence and does not address the reason behind the mistake.
  • Views of a New Graduate Nurse: The Value of Mentorship
    Barbara Robinson
    A brief overview of one nurse's struggles as a new graduate nurse and the importance of improving the working environment for new nurse graduates.
  • Recognizing Heart Disease As a Women's Disease
    Maureen Kroning RN EdD Associate Professor of Nursing at Nyack College School of Nursing
    There are noted differences among heart disease signs between men and women. Coronary Heart Disease can go unnoticed in women until they actually suffer a heart attack (NIH). Thus it is essential women are aware of the signs and symptoms, risk factors and healthy life style choices to prevent the devastating effects of heart disease. .Seeking early treatment when symptoms present is vital in improving the outcome of heart disease. It is important to teach women how to incorporate prevention strategies such as: consuming a healthy diet, maintaining optimum weight, maintaining an active lifestyle, maintaining both normal blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well as avoiding risk factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol limit their stress and any unhealthy behaviors that can lead to heart disease. Advocating for women and promoting education regarding health issues affecting women needs to be a priority so heart disease in women can be prevented and effectively treated.
  • It is Time to Recruit More Men into the Profession of Nursing
    Isaiah Monroe (Nyack College, BSN student) & Maureen Kroning RN EdD (Associate Professor of Nursing, Nyack College, NY)
    It is a benefit to have men working in the profession of nursing. We need to recruit more men into our nursing schools and to work in our healthcare institutions. Both male and female nurses bring different perspectives and benefits to the profession of nursing and to the patient’s they care for. The ability of men to negotiate and obtain higher salaries and positions in both administration and nursing specialty areas may serve as the impetus to elevate the entire nursing profession.
  • One Day, One Shift, One Year
    Maria Hatter, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Nurse's experience of delivering a baby in the restroom of an ED.
  • Self Examination of Body : An Effective Measure for Early Detection and Treatment Properly of Cancers among Girls/Women in Rural Area and Slum Area of India
    Harasankar Adhikari
    Cancer is the one of the scariest and second largest non-communicable disease. It contributes a sizable in the total numbers of deaths. The World cancer Report, 2003 indicates that cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate globally and it would be increased by 50% new cases for the year 2020. In case of India the number is expected to rise seven million by 2015. Ignorance among the public, delayed diagnosis and lack of adequate medical facilities has given it the dubious distribution of being a ‘killer disease’. Only early diagnosis and properly treatment strategies can be prevented the one third of common cancers. It is the prime matter of concern that the female population at their reproductive age and beyond is badly infected by the disease. The incidence of breast cancer, cervix and ovarian cancer are raising steadily. There are several factors like life style and diets specially among urban women associated with this increasing rate of victimization. But among females of rural and urban slums it speaks another scenario because these female populations has a little scope of self examination of their body which is an effective strategy rather than education, awareness and screening test.
  • Educational Requirements for Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty: How do the States Differ?
    Kelli Fuller DNP, RN, ANP-BC Renee Davis DNP, RN, CPNP Bobbi Shatto PhD, RN, CNL
    Nursing shortages have plagued the United States for the past several decades. By 2020, the deficit of Registered Nurses (RN) is projected to exceed 1.2 million (AACN, 2012). One important factor is the shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Every year many qualified applicants are denied admission to nursing programs due to nursing faculty shortages (AACN, 2012). Nursing programs can only accommodate as many students as they have faculty to teach. State Boards of Nursing (SBN) throughout the country are collaborating with colleges and universities to fill nursing faculty vacancies utilizing a variety of creative strategies. An educational research team, at a private university in the Midwestern section of the country, examined each state’s SBN rules and regulations related to pre-licensure faculty requirements for baccalaureate nurse educators. The researchers found that there were vast differences in the educational requirements allowed by individual State Boards of Nursing for Baccalaureate nurse educators.
  • Post-Operative pain management in Total Joint Replacements: Finding a Balance
    Michele E. White, RN, BSN
    Post-operative pain can place patients at high risk for complications (Finding the balance continues)
© 2000-2020 RN-Journal.com // JJP Internet Ventures, LLC
Use of this website constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service Information, articles, Press Releases, videos, and links are published as a convenience to our visitors. Articles are to be used only as a reference aid. They are not intended to be used as a substitute for the exercise of professional judgment. Any questions or comments about the article should be directed to the author. We take no responsibility and give no guarantees, warranties or representations, implied or otherwise, for the content or accuracy.
Website Design & Hosting by Palm Tree Creative