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Journal of Nursing



  • The Importance of Communication and Education toward Patient Literacy: 
    The Importance of Communication and Education toward Patient Literacy: The Relationship of Functional Health and Patient’s Knowledge of Their Chronic Disease and Metabolic Disorder Part Two: The Importance of Understanding Hypertension… by Gary D. Goldberg, PhD Clinical Professor of Medical Education Angeles College of Nursing, Los Angeles, Ca.
    The aging populations in the U.S. with ‘Essential’ Hypertension are showing inadequate health literacy, plus its impact on patients with idiopathic chronic diseases such as type II, adult onset Diabetes Mellitus are makeable. To identify among patients with hypertension and/or with diabetes the relationship between their functional health literacy levels, and the role of the registered nurse as communicator and educator.
  • The Importance of Supporting Mothers Who Breastfeed 
    The Importance of Supporting Mothers Who Breastfeed by Rachel B. Barrientos, Student Nurse, and Paula Bylaska-Davies, RN, MS, Assistant Professor, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
    There are many health benefits to breastfeeding children such as lower mortality rates, ideal nutritional values, and long term benefits such as healthy weights and higher intelligence later in life. The positive aspects of breastfeeding extend to maternal health as well, such as lower rates of breast and ovarian cancers and decreased occurrences of post-partum depression.
  • The new meaning of the word “STAT” 
    The new meaning of the word “STAT” Francis Rhodes, RN
    the word “STAT” and what it means to me compared to what it means to others. In this instance it was sort of a “Hurry up and wait” affair.
  • The Power of Preceptorship 
    The Power of Preceptorship Dr. Susan M. Eley Assistant Professor Indiana State University
    The clinical experience is an essential component to nursing education. The identification of formal preceptors grows increasingly difficult as competition for clinical sites and nursing faculty shortages continue to place a strain on the system.
  • The Significance of the Missed Assessment: HIV/AIDS in the Older Adult 
    by Sarah L. Jameson, Student Nurse Carol A. Eliadi EdD, JD, APRN Assistant Dean and Associate Professor, School of Nursing Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
    The health care system has faced many struggles related to the understanding the HIV virus and in caring for those affected and likely to be affected by this life threatening communicable disease.
    Tags: HIV, AIDS, elderly
  • The Signs and Symptoms’ of Cardiomyopathy: The Awareness and Actions of the Registered Nurse 
    by Gary D. Goldberg, PhD Clinical Professor of Medical Education Angeles College of Nursing, Los Angeles, Ca.
    A careful history-taking by the registered nurse or practitioner along with a complete physical examination can reveal cardiomyopathies, but it is appropriate to confirm the diagnosis with a transthoracic echocardiography and selected laboratory studies.
  • There Are No Simple Cases 
    There Are No Simple Cases by Barbara Tate ASN, RN Tampa General Hospital
    As a twenty year experienced recovery room nurse, I know that no case is ever the same. People are individuals. They react differently to medications. They metabolize drugs at different rates depending on age, body mass, body temperature, kidney and liver functions. Although everyone is different, I can basically expect a certain outcome in recovering people. But in saying this, you can always expect the unexpected.
  • THYROID STORM AND THE AACN SYNERGY MODEL 
    THYROID STORM AND THE AACN SYNERGY MODEL In the Eye of the Storm: Recognizing Thyroid Storm and Applying the AACN Synergy Model Deborah L. Bray, RN, BSN, CNS Graduate Student Murray State University
    Thyroid storm, or thyrotoxic crisis is a rare, but critical hypermetabolic state requiring emergent treatment.
  • TO GOWN OR NOT TO GOWN? 
    TO GOWN OR NOT TO GOWN? FOR MRSA PREVENTION THAT IS THE QUESTION. WHAT IS MRSA? by Amanda Zapka, SN Co-author: Paula Bylaska-Davies, BSN, MSN Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health SciencesTO GOWN OR NOT TO GOWN? FOR MRSA PREVENTION THAT IS THE QUESTION. WHAT IS MRSA?
    The Center for Disease Control (CDC) states that standard precautions should be used for all patients and should be enough to prevent the spread of most MRSA cases. However, in acute-care settings the CDC recommends additional contact precautions be implemented when there are ongoing MRSA transmissions, current infections, previous colonization, and in other special circumstances.
  • UN Noticed 
    UN noticed by Berkley Carter Nurse Manager Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Winston-Salem, N.C.
    it takes more than the knowledge of degrees can provide. It takes the UN noticed hero, our nursing assistant.
  • Videos, Bells and Whistles; Fall Risk or Injury Prevention? 
    by Michelle Myers Glower RN MSN LNC
    The term “Never Event” is not friendly. Never events consist of 28 occurrences on a list of inexcusable outcomes in a healthcare setting. They are defined as "adverse events that are serious, largely preventable, and of concern to both the public and healthcare providers for the purpose of public accountability.
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