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Journal of Nursing



  • My Teaching Learning Philosophy
    Hina Nizar Karim
    My philosophy of teaching learning revolves around the profound belief of Peter (1965). I strongly believe there are certain responsibilities of teachers to make teaching learning effective. First of all, educators must create a difference between education and teaching. Secondly, teaching learning process must be student centered. It must provide opportunity to students to learn according to their interest and needs. Further, students are also responsible for their own learning. Based on my teaching learning philosophy, I can recommend to bring immediate change in our teaching learning environment we need power and authority which now I can bring as a nurse educator.
  • 9 Steps to an Exceptionally Happy Day at Work
    Cynthia Howard RN, CNC, PhD
    Nurses are practical and purposeful. When your job is managing the well-being of other people it can be tough to put yourself in the schedule. Most nurses I know find caring for everyone else easy and the very thought of taking care of themselves may seem selfish. Yet, to achieve true balance one must learn to receive in the cycle of giving.
  • When "Old Dogs" go Back to School
    Mary Ellen Buechel Holbrook
    I went back to college at the age of 62. Being an "old dog", I was not computer savvy, so taking classes mostly on-line was quite challenging. I believe that my trials and triumphs evidenced in this article, will encourage nurses, especially older nurses, to go back to school for their BSN.
  • Are Canadian Nurse Practitioners here to stay?
    Yureve Govind, MD, MBA
    This paper outlines articles that take a closer look into the role of NPs in the Canadian health care system, and how their roles have evolved in response to an ever-changing health care environment.
  • Do Nurses Need Biology?
    Rosemary Oh-McGinnis, PhD and Lynette Sigola, MBChB (Hons), PhD
    As Biology instructors for nursing students, it is an honour to contribute to laying down a foundation in Biology for future nurses. One common question that has emerged among nursing students is “Why do I need to know Biology if I’m going to become a nurse?” We have wrestled with this question for some time. How does one generate an appropriate response to this question? How does one instill within a student the passion for learning Biology? How can one emphasize how valuable understanding Biology will become in the workplace? We hope to raise some interesting discussion and awareness about a topic that we have spent countless hours deliberating amongst ourselves and our colleagues.
  • Is Nursing a Profession
    Laura Steadman, Ed.D, CRNP, MSN, RN Gary Milligan, DNP, MSHA, APHN-BC
    Professions require that educational preparedness must be within institutions of higher learning. In order to be held out as a profession, an individual must be able to practice autonomously within their scope of practice. Nurses have an identified scope of practice mandated by a particular state board of nursing. A profession has a code of ethics which is recognized across numerous levels of practice within the profession. The culture and norms of a profession are easily recognized by the professionals who make-up the body.
  • Bedside Reporting: Embracing the Need for Clinical Change
    Dr. Kelly Duffy, EdD, MSN, RN
    Communication is an integral part of nursing care. The implementation of bedside reporting practices provides an avenue for best practices and improved outcomes.
  • Interactive Technology is Shaping Patient Education and Experience
    Cristina Cassano MSN, RN
    This article describes the Nurse Informatics participation in adopting technology in patient care and nursing workflow. Healthcare settings now integrate electronic medication prescribing, tele-health, online appointment scheduling and mobile laboratories where informatics nurses are essential in guaranteeing that the computerized solutions interface with each other. In order to accomplish information related activities, informatics nurses must synchronize and exchange significant clinical and technical information with the goal of supporting and coordinating safe, effective patient care and assuring an efficient workflow. A strong foundation for addressing the challenges of electronic documentation is the informatics nurses capability to understand and direct the balance of patient care with the technology systems and organizational structure that supports this balance. In order to guarantee a successful implementation of a computer system while managing patient care is to integrate nurses’ perceptions, beliefs, and knowledge in the use of new technology and how nurses implement this technology into their daily nursing practice.
  • Yoga and the Benefits to Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
    Mary Tencza MS RN
    A leading cause of decreased quality of life and debility due to diminished gas exchange, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) progresses slowly with no known cure. The overall effect on other systems and the emotional toll placed on these patients makes activities of daily living exceedingly impossible to manage. The purpose of this article is to conduct a review of the literature to determine the benefits derived from practicing yoga on one’s quality of life and pulmonary functions for those diagnosed with COPD with a special focus on the author’s current practice in home health. In addition The Yoga Sutra and Bhagavad Gita will be reviewed to offer a holistic approach to care.
  • Women and Homelessness
    Grace Augustine, ARNP, Barry University
    Women and homelessness is a great concern that affects the global policy and health determinants to improve health. This case study is a glimpse of the cultural class as it revolves around the lives of mostly White homeless mothers, attending to both everyday lives and cultural norms while exploring and interpreting their interdependencies.
  • Beginnings of a Lifetime
    Billie Cecile Overton RN,MSN
    Inspirational article about becoming a nurse and 38 years later.
  • Provision of Effective Patient Education: A Learning Clinical Experience
    Nighat Karim (BScN Student at Aga Khan University School of Nursing and Midwifery)
    Patient education is one of the fundamental aspects of holistic nursing care. It is the core responsibility of nurses to provide information to the patient and their families that is understandable and appropriate promoting awareness and optimal health. However, student nurses come across to various barriers in providing effective patient education, including decrease knowledge, lack of clear objectives and lack of clinical exposure. Similarly, I came across a similar situation in my community rotations in which I faced obstacles in educating the patient. There are several strategies that results in the provision of effective patient education, which includes, open communication style, written instructions, addressing barriers, formulating teaching plans, identifying learning styles and needs, and use of teaching aids. Therefore, through effective patient education nurses can increase the independence of client for self care in hospital as well as in community settings.
  • An Interesting Assignment to Learn about Mental Illness
    Nicole Csutoros (BSN student) Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    Today, there exist so many various kinds of media including: books, magazines, newspapers, TV, movies, videos, smart phones, computer software and the uncountable sites one can access on the internet. The media is constantly bombarding us with so many messages many of which are subliminal or ostentatious. Subliminal messages from media often suggest what we should buy, how we should act and who we should be friends with. A recent assignment for a psychology class required students to analyze their favorite cartoon characters for signs and symptoms of mental illness. When you assess and analyze some of our favorite childhood cartoon characters some of them display signs and symptoms of mental illness. This assignment engages students to learn about what defining characteristics to look for when assessing patients for mental disorders and just how subliminal messages especially those that are negative can be harmful to our well-being.
  • The Forgotten Arm of Care
    Hilda Pritchard Ming PhD Director Nursing Staff Development Division University Hospital of the West Indies Jamaica
    This article addresses the need for building a healthy work environment amidst the great emphasis on staffing to enhance care .
  • Anesthesia Awareness for Perioperative Nurses
    Joan Boczany
    Anesthesia awareness definition is an unexpected recall of events while under general anesthesia. The majority of the authors place the rate of anesthesia awareness to one patient out of every one thousand patients that experience some form of anesthesia awareness, however the exact mechanism of the pharmacological action of anesthetic is not clearly understood.
  • When Doing The Right Thing Leads to the Wrong Results
    Tracy Nelson-Bungert, RN, MSN
    Reprimanding nurses for medication errors contibutes to a culture of evasion and silence and does not address the reason behind the mistake.
  • Views of a New Graduate Nurse: The Value of Mentorship
    Barbara Robinson
    A brief overview of one nurse's struggles as a new graduate nurse and the importance of improving the working environment for new nurse graduates.
  • Phlebotomy Basics For Nurses
    Mary H. Nielson, DNP, APRN-BC
    The processes of phlebotomy are pivotal for patient care. Nurses may have to perform phlebotomy for their patient in various health care settings. Understanding the procedures, processes and reasons behind phlebotomy is the key to ensuring patient safety and positive patient outcomes.
  • Recognizing Heart Disease As a Women's Disease
    Maureen Kroning RN EdD Associate Professor of Nursing at Nyack College School of Nursing
    There are noted differences among heart disease signs between men and women. Coronary Heart Disease can go unnoticed in women until they actually suffer a heart attack (NIH). Thus it is essential women are aware of the signs and symptoms, risk factors and healthy life style choices to prevent the devastating effects of heart disease. .Seeking early treatment when symptoms present is vital in improving the outcome of heart disease. It is important to teach women how to incorporate prevention strategies such as: consuming a healthy diet, maintaining optimum weight, maintaining an active lifestyle, maintaining both normal blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well as avoiding risk factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol limit their stress and any unhealthy behaviors that can lead to heart disease. Advocating for women and promoting education regarding health issues affecting women needs to be a priority so heart disease in women can be prevented and effectively treated.
  • If You Work in a Hospital
    Jim Owen, MAT, retired EAP Counselor and Regional Manager for Workforce Performance Solutions. I provided EAP and Consulting services to multiple health care institutions and their staff in Northern and Eastern Maine. WPS is headquartered in Portland, Maine, and is a division of Affiliated Healthcare Systems, Bangor, Maine.
    I have been retired almost 3 years. Since retiring, I have been writing poetry instead of clinical records, reports, and contract proposals. Some of my poetry is about work. This poem reflects my experience working with nurses and doctors. I appreciate that poetry is not something you usually publish, however, like a photo, a poem is sometimes worth a thousand words. I think this poem is particularly relevant to the nurses who read your magazine, it has to do with bad days at work, and high expectations regarding patient outcomes.
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