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Journal of Nursing



  • Clinical Decision Support Need for Standardization
    Dr. Chandrashekhar Bhoopalam
    Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) is interactive software that assists physicians in decision-making about their patients. The system utilize data from pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, and other patient monitoring systems to help physicians in enhancing patient care. Statistics show an increase in the number of medical institutions adopting CDSS in pursuit of reducing errors, improving the nursing documentation and improving patient outcomes. This paper discusses errors arising from the use of CDSS and ways of preventing them.
  • Women’s knowledge regarding preventive measures of Food Poisoning in Khartoum, Sudan
    Waled Amen Mohammed Ahmed
    The objective of this article is to assess the mothers' knowledge regarding preventive measures of food poisoning in Khartoum. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study; it was conducted in Alemtidad area during period extended from September to December 2012, it involved 88 mothers selected by convenience. Data were collected by using designed questionnaire then analyzed by (SPSS). It was found that; mothers’ knowledge about preventive measures for food poisoning is satisfactory concerning; hand washing, washing vegetables and cooking appropriately. The economic status, level of education, and housing condition are not predicting factors influencing level of mothers’ knowledge about food poisoning. The mothers in Khartoum have acceptable level of knowledge about food poisoning. There is need for strengthening the situation through education sessions
  • Advocacy for Those without a Voice: Helping Parents with Smoking Cessation
    Karmen Dayhuff, Christa McAfee, Deb Vincent, Susan Eley
    The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize current research in the area of second-hand smoke exposure in children and smoking cessation interventions for their parents.
  • Dear Mr. R
    Lauren Rathbun
    If you could write a letter to that patient you just can't forget, what would you say?
  • Making the Transition From Student to Working RN
    Ron Simpson, RN
    Guidelines and tips for transitioning to working nurse and additional tips on surviving the first year.
  • Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 
    by Kristin vanWyngeeren, BSN Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences School of Nursing Tammy Stuart, MS, RN Assistant Professor Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
    Research shows that turnover rates are high for new nurse graduates as a result of a stressful work environment coupled with inadequate support during the transition from student to professional practice. This article seeks to define the problem of new nurse graduate retention, examine strategies implemented by specific organizations that decreased turnover rates of new graduate nurses, and offer recommendations for the new graduate nurse about to enter professional practice.
  • Clinical Nurse Leadership and Performance Improvement on Surgical Unit 
    by Cheryl A. Landry RN,MSN,CNL(c)
    There are many ways that nurses can prevent harm to their patients one method is to provide the necessary care that will promote only positive outcomes for their patients.
  • Culturally Competent Nursing in Homecare 
    Meghan Crivello, BS, RN, BSN
    Homecare nurses must be culturally aware in order to appropriately care for homecare patients. Culture plays a part in the care of all types of patients but it plays a more important role in homecare.
  • I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 
    by Linda Ritter, RN
    Time and time again changes were thrust on us and made to sound as if they were the answers to all our problems, when, in reality, they created more problems and basically cured nothing.
  • Let’s get rid of the “bad apples”
    Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    One of the most stressful challenges of the nurses working environment has become working among our own colleagues. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, and “Lateral Violence” are now included among our long list of stressful issues nurses face each and every day. These terms include behavior that is undesirable for any institution and is counterproductive in any environment. Undesirable behaviors can involve not only nurses but any employee in an institution including that administration. The effects it has on nursing can be detrimental to the entire profession and even cause many to leave the profession of nursing altogether. We must begin to address this issue with specific interventions and we must do it now for it can and will taint the image of nurses who are smiling at work, providing caring, compassion, and good rapport with their fellow colleagues and have an investment in the organization to do well.
  • What do they expect? A comparison of student expectations and outcomes of undergraduate research experiences
    David M Chapinski
    The big challenges facing nursing students today have permanent effects on us all as patients. Nursing students need to be able to value the relevance, authority, and utility of nursing research for patient care through embedding research learning in both academic and practice-based settings. Students can be supported in learning how to access, understand, and appraise the authority of research through weaving these skills into enquiry-based learning. Furthermore, encouraging students to undertake research- based practice change projects can support research utilization and development skills.
  • Care of the Pediatric Patient
    Leah Toms
    Short exemplar about caring for a pediatric patient in Interventional Radiology
  • The Benefits of Keeping a Nursing Journal
    Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    Each day, nurses are playing a crucial role in someone’s life. They are a part of so many incredible stories and often they are not even aware of just how incredible their stories are and the impact these stories have on themselves, their patients, their own colleagues and their healthcare facilities. Most nurses will tell you that healthcare has changed drastically over the years and they probably would not say for the better. As nurses, we often practice in chaotic environments; one that is so vastly changing and one that is so hard to keep up with it. Keeping a nursing journal can not only put a voice to our unique nursing stories but can provide so many other benefits.
  • Remember When We Were Nursing Students
    Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    I remember, as most nurses can, their days in nursing school, feeling anxious and scared going to clinical rotations to take care of real living patients and not just the mannequins in the lab. Most us can also recall how the floor nurses treated us as students engrossed in our clinical rotations. There were nurses who made a positive impression on us and unfortunately there were nurses who did not make a positive impression. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, “Vertical Violence” and “Internal Violence” have become too familiar in today’s nursing literature. As an Associate Professor of Nursing, it is a shame to have to include such terms in nursing lectures and worse of all trying to explain reasons this may be happening among nurses and just may happen to them as nursing students. According to Luparell (2011) “Because today’s student are tomorrow’s colleagues, conversations regarding incivility and bullying should include specific aspects of nursing academia and the preparation of new nurses”.
  • My Nursing Career A Whole New Appreciation 
    Mary Ellen Buechel Holbrook, RN, BA, TNCC
    Not a day goes by, without reading in the newspaper and hearing over the radio or TV about the rising rate of unemployment in our country. It is this reality that has given me a whole new appreciation for being a nurse.
  • The Blessing: A Nurse’s Story
    Mary Ellen Buechel Holbrook, RN, BA, TNCC, CPAN
    It was nine o’clock pm and I was walking briskly out of Recovery Room, knowing I had to be back the next day at six am. Though in a hurry, I purveyed the family waiting room to see if there were any visitors who needed help after the patient representative had gone home. I immediately noticed a lone woman with an anxious look on her face. As it turned out, her daughter-in-law had just been transferred to Intensive Care. Instead of waiting for one of our transporters, I decided to take her up myself. As we headed down the hall, she stated: “I bet you’re trying to leave, aren’t you?” I affirmed her observation. I added that, it was quite all right. We arrived at the particular ICU where her daughter-in-law was transferred, and upon talking with the patient’s RN, I was able to let her in right away. She turned to me and said: “Thank you; you will be blessed.”
  • Effectiveness of Sexual Health Promotion in Adolescents
    Larissa McLaughlin, BSN Eleanor Broer, BSN
    The authors illustrate the importance of sexual health promotion in the adolescent population through school-wide and community based efforts through a literature review composed of peer-reviewed, primary sources.
  • Applying Ethical Standards to the Assessment of Pain
    Connie Boehman, BSN RN Indiana Wesleyan University MSN student
    A nurse's role and responsibility is to ensure that our patient(s) receive adequate care and our assessments are comprehensive and thorough. One of the methods of assisting with pain assessment is applying ethical standards.
  • It Is Time to Openly Assess & Discuss Mental Illness
    Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    With the prevalence of mental illness on the rise, nurses in all healthcare settings are going to be tasked with providing care for patients with a mental disorder. Thus, it is necessary to provide nurses with the skills necessary to care for patients with mental illness.
  • Mental Health Need Assessment Tool
    Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    Patient assessment is the first step in the nursing process. Assessing for mental illness is necessary in order to provide safe and competent care. Using a tool that incorporates Maslow's hierarchy of needs to assess if a patient feels that their needs are being met or not met is a good first step to begin assessing the mental health status of our patients.
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