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Journal of Nursing : Diabetes



  • Diabetes Insipidus
    Karen Resseguie-Vickstrom, BSN, BBA, MBA (current DNP student)
    ABSTRACT: Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is a deficiency response to the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) also known as vasopressin. There are two types of vasopressin (V) receptors known as V1 and V2 in which the V1 receptors located in the vascular smooth muscles cause vasoconstriction whereas V2 receptors located on the tubular cells of the cortical collecting duct control the reabsorption of water via the kidneys. DI effects the renal mechanisms of the water reabsorption which is particularly imperative for maintaining body fluid osmolality. Edification that medication management is available in conjunction with readily accessible liquids at all times to replenish the enormous losses that occur through urination in addition to enforcement that this disease can easily turn to life threatening if not managed properly. PURPOSE STATEMENT: The principle of this article is to aide nurses and advanced specialty nurses in providing educational awareness to parents whom have a child with Diabetes Insipidus as it correlates with an insufficient response to the antidiuretic hormone (ADH).
  • Managing Type II Diabetes within the Hispanic Community
    Kathy Nobles
    Diabetes is termed the life style disease for good reason. It is a progressive and chronic illness largely caused by obesity and lack of exercise. If left untreated or poorly controlled, this disease can lead to debilitating complications and premature death.
  • The Reality of Diabetes in Rural Mexico: A Nursing Student Perspective
    Hillary E. Handler Suzanne M. Le Markita A. Balfour Maria de la Luz Bonilla Sebastiana del Rosario Gargantua Aguila Karen A. Monsen
    Students from six universities in Canada, Mexico, and the USA participated in a service learning exchange. In order to understand the needs of diabetes patients in rural Mexico three students from Canada and the USA trudged in the heat through the rough terrain to their homes. We used Omaha System signs/symptoms to collect interview data. The standardized language of the questionnaire allowed us to be aware of the interaction between traditional medical beliefs and the western medical model. Some of these challenges include maintaining the traditional family roles, controlling blood glucose levels without the appropriate medical equipment, and economic barriers. One patient was responsible for both caring for her eight young children and working in the fields to put food on the table. Additionally, she was in a constant hypoglycemic state causing her to faint in the fields. We also visited a visually impaired man that was distraught because he needed to rely on others for help in a machismo society. He said “While living in New York City, I was a victim of a robbery. I was so afraid because I thought I was going to die and as a result I got diabetes.” Though some may find this comment strange, it is a common theory among the rural population in Mexico. We will always remember the many Mexican speculate that eating bread absorbs the scare and thus prevents diabetes. This experience gave us a glimpse of the harsh reality that these people face everyday coping with diabetes.
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