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Journal of Nursing : Nursing



  • Managing the Inevitability of Change
    Sarah Mensa-Kwao Cook, RN, BSN
    Change is inevitable. Whether we are changing our minds, our clothes, or a channel on television, we know change happens… and we are fine with it, when we are the ones enacting it. However, what about when change happens to us? This article explores the effects of a hospital’s unit closing on staff – the good, the bad, and the ugly – and seeks to identify ways to mitigate the bad and ugly emotional responses, and hopefully explore means of increasing the good (by both hospital management practice, and individual mindset). A unit in one of south Florida leading hospital serves as a case study as we delve into this topic.
  • The Calling - A Poem
    Deborah Kelley
    Poem about nursing
    Tags: nursing, poem
  • Post-Fall Care Nursing Algorithm
    Keisha Lovence DNP, MSN, ACNP-BC, RN
    Post-Fall care practices are an integral aspect to patient care. As we care for older adults it is important to consider post-fall care practices.
  • The Importance of Educating in Real-Time
    Lauren Lebo BSN Student, Nyack College, NY ; Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    Working in the acute care hospital, provides many opportunities to learn. As healthcare workers, we must recognize and act quickly on any situation that puts a patient at risk. A recent situation occurred in the hospital that required both the need to act and to provide education in real-time.
  • Attitude Matters
    Kenechi Onwumelu BSN Student Nyack College, Nyack NY Maureen Kroning, RN EdD
    Even with a shared set of values and behaviors, we cannot underestimate the nurse’s attitude towards: others, their patients, their co-workers, and the organization they work for and towards the profession of nursing.
  • Preparation of Faculty in the Era of Educational Technology
    Josephine Kamera, MSN, RN
    While online nursing education programs are on the increase, faculty is constantly challenged to teach effectively in online environment. Preparation of nursing faculty in educational technology provides avenues for successful online teaching.
  • Bearers of Light
    Deborah Kelley
    A poem about nurses. The bearers of light in the darkness of patients' lives.
  • Do Nurses Need Biology?
    Rosemary Oh-McGinnis, PhD and Lynette Sigola, MBChB (Hons), PhD
    As Biology instructors for nursing students, it is an honour to contribute to laying down a foundation in Biology for future nurses. One common question that has emerged among nursing students is “Why do I need to know Biology if I’m going to become a nurse?” We have wrestled with this question for some time. How does one generate an appropriate response to this question? How does one instill within a student the passion for learning Biology? How can one emphasize how valuable understanding Biology will become in the workplace? We hope to raise some interesting discussion and awareness about a topic that we have spent countless hours deliberating amongst ourselves and our colleagues.
  • Is Nursing a Profession
    Laura Steadman, Ed.D, CRNP, MSN, RN Gary Milligan, DNP, MSHA, APHN-BC
    Professions require that educational preparedness must be within institutions of higher learning. In order to be held out as a profession, an individual must be able to practice autonomously within their scope of practice. Nurses have an identified scope of practice mandated by a particular state board of nursing. A profession has a code of ethics which is recognized across numerous levels of practice within the profession. The culture and norms of a profession are easily recognized by the professionals who make-up the body.
  • Beginnings of a Lifetime
    Billie Cecile Overton RN,MSN
    Inspirational article about becoming a nurse and 38 years later.
  • The Forgotten Arm of Care
    Hilda Pritchard Ming PhD Director Nursing Staff Development Division University Hospital of the West Indies Jamaica
    This article addresses the need for building a healthy work environment amidst the great emphasis on staffing to enhance care .
  • The Future of Nursing Education: Heading for a Major Crisis
    Rebecca E. Przywara, BSN Student Nyack College, NY & Maureen Kroning RN EdD, Associate Professor at Nyack College, NY
    Nursing as a practice and profession has experienced significant changes over the years. For instance, in the 1800s nurses were expected to be subservient to doctors. Just hear what the doctor who gave Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduation address: "Every nurse must remember that it is the attending physician's business to make a diagnosis of disease and hence that she should never hazard an opinion herself, under any circumstances." (Dr. Hooker, Springfield Hospital Annual Report, 1894). It would be interesting to know what the nursing faculty were thinking when they heard those words. Thankfully nurses during that era did not take the doctor’s advice and remained dedicated to advance and advocate for the profession of nursing. Around the same time that Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduating class were listening to their graduation address, Florence Nightingale along with other nurse advocates, were making incredible strides to implement nursing education. After the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale recognized and introduced the need for formal nursing education but the education was limited to basic nursing knowledge and skills. As a result of the Women’s Rights Movement in the 1900s, the idea of nursing as a profession evolved into a reality. As society’s healthcare needs changed, nursing education had to change to meet those needs. There were however, challenges each century faced when trying to ensure nursing education met society’s needs and today, the challenges faced are heading right for a major crisis.
  • DNP and the Transformational Leaders
    Bo Soobryan
    Transitioning advanced nursing practice to the doctoral level represents the natural evolution of the nursing profession and the right moves to ensure that nurses are prepared for the highest level of practice. Many advocates within the health care community (local and national authorities) are calling and welcoming the DNP role. National and state agencies, as a leading advocate for advanced practice nursing, understands greatly the contributions APNs (advanced practice nurse) make in the health care system as cost-effective providers. In addition, APNs have identified the need for additional education in the areas of evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems management, among others (Kaplan & Brown, 2009). This transition in the education of advanced practice nurses (APNs) is targeted to meet the increasingly complex needs of patients, families, and communities in a rapidly changing health care environment. DNP education also has the potential to transform the nursing profession in a variety of ways. These include: • Creating and adopting new roles in nursing practice • Increasing the influence of APNs in health care and policy development • Promoting leadership by APNs in their workplace and health care organizations • Enhancing the self-concept of advanced practice nurses • Strengthening inter-professional relationships and collaborations. (Kaplan & Brown, 2009; Swider, Levin, Cowell, Breakwell, Holland, & Wallinder, 2009) The DNP stimulates the creation and adoption of new advanced practice role. As health care becomes more complex, it will take such strong leadership criteria for nurses in all fields to continue to improve their own standards and the qualifications of others in the field (Kaplan & Brown, 2009).
  • The Birmingham VA Nursing Academy Partnership
    Dr. Laura Steadman, Kimberly D. Froelich, PhD, RN, NE-BC, ARNP, VHA-CM, Angie Harrison, RN, VANAP scholar, Taylor Wiggins, RN, VANAP scholar, Elijah Berry, RN, VANAP scholar
    This article describes a partnership and the importance of partnering with the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing as part of a pilot program in The United States to promote nursing careers in the VA hospital and to improve the quality of nursing education in the School of Nursing. Since it began, in 2009, this program, called the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy Partnership, has consistently performed beyond expectations to increase the breadth of knowledge for a select group of baccalaureate nursing students. Further it has created a strong connection between the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, a professional resource that benefits all students and faculty.
  • Rising to the Challenge of Nursing Education
    Beth Kalkman, MSN RN, RNC-OB
    As the nursing shortage and nursing faculty shortage continue, it is imperative that we look to innovative measures in order to increase the number of available baccalaureate prepared nurses. At the same time, it is crucial that we do not neglect the quality of education required to receive the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. This paper examines potential solutions to the ongoing nursing shortage.
  • Nursing School Angel
    Kelly Fulghum, RN
    How a patient in nursing school taught me how to deal with life and death
  • Successful Aging For Canada's LGBT Older Adults
    Tosh Reed
    A research paper I wrote for my BSN degree regarding how health care services, particularly nursing can accommodate older adult members of the LGBT community and provide safe and best practice care.
  • Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs
    Glenn Javelona Yaira Kurtzman
    Many professions have long since realized that a vast divide exists between the classroom and real-world practice and, thus, have mandated transitional programs. Nursing lacks such an intermediate step as part of its professional training although new nurses are pressured to provide both safe and competent care to increasingly complex patients without any transitional support (Pittman, Herrera, Bass, & Thompson, 2013). To fill this gap many institutions have begun to implement their own nurse-residency programs [NRPs]. However, since not all institutions have introduced such transition-into-practice programs barriers must exist. Nationwide, NRPs are shrouded in confusion, false perceptions, and concerns that hinder their implementation. This manuscript was compiled to help shed light onto the reasons for the lack of implementation and provides evidence of the importance and overall benefits for such programs. Personal perspectives are also provided from the authors in order to gain a nursing-student perspective about these transitional programs.
  • Reflections of Nurse Educator
    Chinazo Echezona-Johnson, Ed.D, LL.B, MSN, RNC-MNN Assistant Director of Maternal-Child Educator, Health and Hospital Corporation, Metropolitan Hospital Center
    Teaching is an art. Some people are born teachers while others acquire the skill. To be a great teacher, one has to have a sense of humor and be very flexible. Teachers will never teach to gain monetary reward. However, they will teach to achieve the best reward - satisfaction that they have an impact on the education of the leaders of the world, the training of CEOs, and the success of new breed of professionals. Teaching is a noble profession.
  • History of Ebola and Nursing
    Chinazo Echezona-Johnson, Ed.D, LL.B, RNC-MNN Assistant Director of Nursing/Women and Children Nursing Education Metropolitan Hospital Center
    Many healthcare providers and the public are paying very special attention to the outbreak of the Ebola Virus in West Africa and the subsequent infection of the two critical care nurses at Texas. Many healthcare professionals expressed their confusion about the virus and the seeming stigmatization of nurses. Currently with the outbreak in Texas, nurses and other healthcare providers were encountered the same dilemmas as Central Africa nurses years ago.
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