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Journal of Nursing : Education



  • Current and Future Educational Challenges for the Nurse Educator
    Skip Morelock PhD, RN, NEA-BC
    This article explores current trends in nursing education.
  • The Importance of Educating in Real-Time
    Lauren Lebo BSN Student, Nyack College, NY ; Maureen Kroning RN EdD
    Working in the acute care hospital, provides many opportunities to learn. As healthcare workers, we must recognize and act quickly on any situation that puts a patient at risk. A recent situation occurred in the hospital that required both the need to act and to provide education in real-time.
  • Preparation of Faculty in the Era of Educational Technology
    Josephine Kamera, MSN, RN
    While online nursing education programs are on the increase, faculty is constantly challenged to teach effectively in online environment. Preparation of nursing faculty in educational technology provides avenues for successful online teaching.
  • Interactive Technology is Shaping Patient Education and Experience
    Cristina Cassano MSN, RN
    This article describes the Nurse Informatics participation in adopting technology in patient care and nursing workflow. Healthcare settings now integrate electronic medication prescribing, tele-health, online appointment scheduling and mobile laboratories where informatics nurses are essential in guaranteeing that the computerized solutions interface with each other. In order to accomplish information related activities, informatics nurses must synchronize and exchange significant clinical and technical information with the goal of supporting and coordinating safe, effective patient care and assuring an efficient workflow. A strong foundation for addressing the challenges of electronic documentation is the informatics nurses capability to understand and direct the balance of patient care with the technology systems and organizational structure that supports this balance. In order to guarantee a successful implementation of a computer system while managing patient care is to integrate nurses’ perceptions, beliefs, and knowledge in the use of new technology and how nurses implement this technology into their daily nursing practice.
  • Provision of Effective Patient Education: A Learning Clinical Experience
    Nighat Karim (BScN Student at Aga Khan University School of Nursing and Midwifery)
    Patient education is one of the fundamental aspects of holistic nursing care. It is the core responsibility of nurses to provide information to the patient and their families that is understandable and appropriate promoting awareness and optimal health. However, student nurses come across to various barriers in providing effective patient education, including decrease knowledge, lack of clear objectives and lack of clinical exposure. Similarly, I came across a similar situation in my community rotations in which I faced obstacles in educating the patient. There are several strategies that results in the provision of effective patient education, which includes, open communication style, written instructions, addressing barriers, formulating teaching plans, identifying learning styles and needs, and use of teaching aids. Therefore, through effective patient education nurses can increase the independence of client for self care in hospital as well as in community settings.
  • The Future of Nursing Education: Heading for a Major Crisis
    Rebecca E. Przywara, BSN Student Nyack College, NY & Maureen Kroning RN EdD, Associate Professor at Nyack College, NY
    Nursing as a practice and profession has experienced significant changes over the years. For instance, in the 1800s nurses were expected to be subservient to doctors. Just hear what the doctor who gave Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduation address: "Every nurse must remember that it is the attending physician's business to make a diagnosis of disease and hence that she should never hazard an opinion herself, under any circumstances." (Dr. Hooker, Springfield Hospital Annual Report, 1894). It would be interesting to know what the nursing faculty were thinking when they heard those words. Thankfully nurses during that era did not take the doctor’s advice and remained dedicated to advance and advocate for the profession of nursing. Around the same time that Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduating class were listening to their graduation address, Florence Nightingale along with other nurse advocates, were making incredible strides to implement nursing education. After the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale recognized and introduced the need for formal nursing education but the education was limited to basic nursing knowledge and skills. As a result of the Women’s Rights Movement in the 1900s, the idea of nursing as a profession evolved into a reality. As society’s healthcare needs changed, nursing education had to change to meet those needs. There were however, challenges each century faced when trying to ensure nursing education met society’s needs and today, the challenges faced are heading right for a major crisis.
  • The Birmingham VA Nursing Academy Partnership
    Dr. Laura Steadman, Kimberly D. Froelich, PhD, RN, NE-BC, ARNP, VHA-CM, Angie Harrison, RN, VANAP scholar, Taylor Wiggins, RN, VANAP scholar, Elijah Berry, RN, VANAP scholar
    This article describes a partnership and the importance of partnering with the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing as part of a pilot program in The United States to promote nursing careers in the VA hospital and to improve the quality of nursing education in the School of Nursing. Since it began, in 2009, this program, called the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy Partnership, has consistently performed beyond expectations to increase the breadth of knowledge for a select group of baccalaureate nursing students. Further it has created a strong connection between the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, a professional resource that benefits all students and faculty.
  • Rising to the Challenge of Nursing Education
    Beth Kalkman, MSN RN, RNC-OB
    As the nursing shortage and nursing faculty shortage continue, it is imperative that we look to innovative measures in order to increase the number of available baccalaureate prepared nurses. At the same time, it is crucial that we do not neglect the quality of education required to receive the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. This paper examines potential solutions to the ongoing nursing shortage.
  • Educational Requirements for Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty: How do the States Differ?
    Kelli Fuller DNP, RN, ANP-BC Renee Davis DNP, RN, CPNP Bobbi Shatto PhD, RN, CNL
    Nursing shortages have plagued the United States for the past several decades. By 2020, the deficit of Registered Nurses (RN) is projected to exceed 1.2 million (AACN, 2012). One important factor is the shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Every year many qualified applicants are denied admission to nursing programs due to nursing faculty shortages (AACN, 2012). Nursing programs can only accommodate as many students as they have faculty to teach. State Boards of Nursing (SBN) throughout the country are collaborating with colleges and universities to fill nursing faculty vacancies utilizing a variety of creative strategies. An educational research team, at a private university in the Midwestern section of the country, examined each state’s SBN rules and regulations related to pre-licensure faculty requirements for baccalaureate nurse educators. The researchers found that there were vast differences in the educational requirements allowed by individual State Boards of Nursing for Baccalaureate nurse educators.
  • Reducing Lateral Violence: A humanistic educational approach (2013)
    Janet M. Reed, RN BSN, MSN
    We’ve all witnessed it: the gossip, backbiting, and bullying that too often occurs in the nursing workplace. Lateral violence (LV), also known as horizontal violence or workplace bullying, consists of behaviors including “bullying, intimidation, sarcasm, back-stabbing, criticism, exclusion, and various forms of unequal treatment”. LV has been a topic of ongoing topic of concern in nursing for many years and is particularly prevalent in female dominated professions. LV is often attributed to oppression theory, which states that nurses are an oppressed group because they are deemed less important than others (such as medical practitioners); therefore, nurses often lack autonomy and control over their profession which results in powerlessness and displaced aggression towards other nurses.
  • Effectiveness of Sexual Health Promotion in Adolescents
    Larissa McLaughlin, BSN Eleanor Broer, BSN
    The authors illustrate the importance of sexual health promotion in the adolescent population through school-wide and community based efforts through a literature review composed of peer-reviewed, primary sources.
  • The Cardiac Diagnostic Interventional Symposium (CDIS), 2013
    John H. Balcom; RN, BScN, BHA; staff nurse, Creator and Chair of CDIS
    The symposium focused on nursing and allied healthcare professional education.
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