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Journal of Nursing : Nurse



  • Factors Influencing Nurse Medication Errors
    Skip Morelock PhD, RN, NEA-BC Clinical Professor of Nursing Collin College
    This article explores the medication errors and the phenomena of nurse distractions. Nurses are intimately involved in the medication administration process. Even though the parameters of selection, dosing, compounding, and dispensing medication remain under the purview of other allied health professionals, the nurse represents the last safety checkpoint between the medication and the patient and efforts should be directed toward removing obstacles which are negatively impacting this process. It has long been suspected that nursing distractions whether by patient, family, coworkers or others, are facilitating the occurrence of errors in the hospital setting. There are practices which are discussed which may ameliorate this threat to some extent if employed consistently and judiciously.
  • My Professional Path as a Nurse
    Ruby Z. Chu, RN, MSN/ED, CCRN
    When I was a little girl, I’ve always been fascinated to see nurses in white uniform. I have this inner desire that nursing is something that I really wanted to do. Eventually, I enrolled in the nursing program and finished my degree. I started working in medical area and I learned that to be a nurse you have to be caring, patient, integrity, intelligent, have a compassionate and listening ear, and always seek knowledge for advancement.
  • Let Volunteers Answer The Call
    Irene Brennick
    How volunteers take pressure off of Nurses
  • Current and Future Educational Challenges for the Nurse Educator
    Skip Morelock PhD, RN, NEA-BC
    This article explores current trends in nursing education.
  • "Just a nurse"
    Erin Pettengill
    Being a nurse is sufficient...think outside of the box
  • Are Canadian Nurse Practitioners here to stay?
    Yureve Govind, MD, MBA
    This paper outlines articles that take a closer look into the role of NPs in the Canadian health care system, and how their roles have evolved in response to an ever-changing health care environment.
  • Views of a New Graduate Nurse: The Value of Mentorship
    Barbara Robinson
    A brief overview of one nurse's struggles as a new graduate nurse and the importance of improving the working environment for new nurse graduates.
  • Disparities in Healthcare: Night Shift Nurses
    Skip Morelock PhD, RN, NEA-BC
    Night shift nurses have been shown more likely to developing health issues than their day shift counterparts. Research over the past twenty years has led to the increasing conclusion that working night shifts for as little as eight shifts a month is associated with an increased likelihood to develop metabolic syndrome, a four-fold increase in the incidence of vascular events, and an increased chanceofdeveloping certain cancers.
  • It is Time to Recruit More Men into the Profession of Nursing
    Isaiah Monroe (Nyack College, BSN student) & Maureen Kroning RN EdD (Associate Professor of Nursing, Nyack College, NY)
    It is a benefit to have men working in the profession of nursing. We need to recruit more men into our nursing schools and to work in our healthcare institutions. Both male and female nurses bring different perspectives and benefits to the profession of nursing and to the patient’s they care for. The ability of men to negotiate and obtain higher salaries and positions in both administration and nursing specialty areas may serve as the impetus to elevate the entire nursing profession.
  • Rising to the Challenge of Nursing Education
    Beth Kalkman, MSN RN, RNC-OB
    As the nursing shortage and nursing faculty shortage continue, it is imperative that we look to innovative measures in order to increase the number of available baccalaureate prepared nurses. At the same time, it is crucial that we do not neglect the quality of education required to receive the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. This paper examines potential solutions to the ongoing nursing shortage.
  • Quiet Servant
    Deborah J. Camak ,MSN,RNC
    A poem dedicated to the service of community health nurses.
  • Reflections of Nurse Educator
    Chinazo Echezona-Johnson, Ed.D, LL.B, MSN, RNC-MNN Assistant Director of Maternal-Child Educator, Health and Hospital Corporation, Metropolitan Hospital Center
    Teaching is an art. Some people are born teachers while others acquire the skill. To be a great teacher, one has to have a sense of humor and be very flexible. Teachers will never teach to gain monetary reward. However, they will teach to achieve the best reward - satisfaction that they have an impact on the education of the leaders of the world, the training of CEOs, and the success of new breed of professionals. Teaching is a noble profession.
  • Prescriptive Authority for Nurse Practitioners
    Lacy Kusy
    The physician shortage in primary care, plus the growth of nurse practitioners and increasing need for access to health care, creates a necessity for more autonomous nurse practitioners. However, current restrictions on nurse practitioners, particularly prescription regulations for controlled substances, limit what practitioners can do for patients. These restrictions also increase wait times for patients and have the potential to increase liability claims as physicians prescribe medications for patients they have not adequately evaluated. Nurse practitioners have proven to be a safe, quality, and cost saving approach to primary care. To meet the growing needs for patients, nurse practitioners must have the ability to prescribe controlled substances in all 50 states.
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS AFFECTING EATING HABITS AMONG NURSES IN GENERAL HOSPITAL
    Principal Author: Cik Norfidah Binti Mohamad Contributing Author(s) 1. Zaleha Binti Mohd Hashim 2. Umi Kalsom Binti Ibrahim 3. Nordiana Binti Borhan Designation PA Head, Department of Nursing CA1. Registered Nurse CA2. Registered Nurse CA3. Registered Nurse Principal Author Tel. No: +6019 2413108 Principal Author-email address: [email protected]
    Abstract Background: Obesity and overweight are more frequent in workers working in shift and psychological distress increased among working women in Malaysia. A supportive manager and a flexible working time are linked with a decrease of the conflicts between family and work. Objectives: The purpose of the research was to investigate the patterns of eating habit and its relationship factors, with focus on psychological factor among nurses. Methods: A study of 100 nurses was conducted in medical-surgical wards of a public hospital. Data was collected using a cross sectional study using a convenience sampling (non probability). A self-administered questionnaire on eating habits was used, and analyzed using SPSS (version 21). Results: A majority of (89%) participants was from a female group while a number of male participants are only (11%). Majority (86%) responded they ate because of feeling happy followed by eating because of feeling lonely (80%) and most of them did not perceived that they have a healthy eating habits (53%). Conclusions: The findings indicated that employers need to identify physical workload that is acceptable to avoid risks of unhealthy eating habits and monitor the availability of healthy food in the worksite. Keywords: Eating habits,Psychological Factors, working in shifts.
  • Making the Transition From Student to Working RN
    Ron Simpson, RN
    Guidelines and tips for transitioning to working nurse and additional tips on surviving the first year.
  • Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 
    by Kristin vanWyngeeren, BSN Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences School of Nursing Tammy Stuart, MS, RN Assistant Professor Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
    Research shows that turnover rates are high for new nurse graduates as a result of a stressful work environment coupled with inadequate support during the transition from student to professional practice. This article seeks to define the problem of new nurse graduate retention, examine strategies implemented by specific organizations that decreased turnover rates of new graduate nurses, and offer recommendations for the new graduate nurse about to enter professional practice.
  • Clinical Nurse Leadership and Performance Improvement on Surgical Unit 
    by Cheryl A. Landry RN,MSN,CNL(c)
    There are many ways that nurses can prevent harm to their patients one method is to provide the necessary care that will promote only positive outcomes for their patients.
  • I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 
    by Linda Ritter, RN
    Time and time again changes were thrust on us and made to sound as if they were the answers to all our problems, when, in reality, they created more problems and basically cured nothing.
  • Applying Ethical Standards to the Assessment of Pain
    Connie Boehman, BSN RN Indiana Wesleyan University MSN student
    A nurse's role and responsibility is to ensure that our patient(s) receive adequate care and our assessments are comprehensive and thorough. One of the methods of assisting with pain assessment is applying ethical standards.
  • Do nurses really understand Advanced Health Care Directives?
    Maureen Kroning RN MSN EdD
    As a Nursing Supervisor, I have witnessed many problems associated with patients Advanced Health Care Directives (AHCD). On many occasions, patients are asked about AHCD when their medical condition worsens, leaving education of AHCD lacking and often put to the family to make end-of-life decisions. Both nurses and patients have verbalized not understanding AHCD. At the local hospital not only have many nurses acknowledged not understanding their role and responsibility about AHCD, but they also do not really have a good understanding themselves of what AHCD are; therefore, they do not feel comfortable educating patients and families about this vital healthcare issue. Research shows that providing AHCD education is effective in changing not only the treatment preferences of patients, but their attitudes toward end-of-life health care (AHRQ, 2003). There was an eminent need to look into this problem at the local community hospital.
    Tags: health, nurse
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