Entires with the tag 'Student' in the Journal of Nursing

Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Many professions have long since realized that a vast divide exists between the classroom and real-world practice and, thus, have mandated transitional programs. Nursing lacks such an intermediate step as part of its professional training although new nurses are pressured to provide both safe and competent care to increasingly complex patients without any transitional support (Pittman, Herrera, Bass, & Thompson, 2013). To fill this gap many institutions have begun to implement their own nurse-residency programs [NRPs]. However, since not all institutions have introduced such transition-into-practice programs barriers must exist. Nationwide, NRPs are shrouded in confusion, false perceptions, and concerns that hinder their implementation. This manuscript was compiled to help shed light onto the reasons for the lack of implementation and provides evidence of the importance and overall benefits for such programs. Personal perspectives are also provided from the authors in order to gain a nursing-student perspective about these transitional programs.

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Why Do Nurses Eat Their Young?

Why Do Nurses Eat Their Young?

This article discusses issues related to new nurses regarding bullying and how the problem can be solved.

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A Study To Exploring Nursing Students’ Lived Experiences In Pediatric Clinical Practice In A  Selected College, Chennai

A Study To Exploring Nursing Students’ Lived Experiences In Pediatric Clinical Practice In A Selected College, Chennai

The results of this research can serve as a reference for nursing teachers to design appropriate courses for pediatric nursing curriculum.

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The Hospital Room: Not Just Four Walls

The Hospital Room: Not Just Four Walls

The patient room is a place where patients and families learn about an illness and treatment plan, and where patients get better or worse. It is very important for nurses/nursing students to get a sense of the emotion that goes on in these rooms, the room is more than four walls.

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Remember When We Were Nursing Students

Remember When We Were Nursing Students

I remember, as most nurses can, their days in nursing school, feeling anxious and scared going to clinical rotations to take care of real living patients and not just the mannequins in the lab. Most us can also recall how the floor nurses treated us as students engrossed in our clinical rotations. There were nurses who made a positive impression on us and unfortunately there were nurses who did not make a positive impression. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, “Vertical Violence” and “Internal Violence” have become too familiar in today’s nursing literature. As an Associate Professor of Nursing, it is a shame to have to include such terms in nursing lectures and worse of all trying to explain reasons this may be happening among nurses and just may happen to them as nursing students. According to Luparell (2011) “Because today’s student are tomorrow’s colleagues, conversations regarding incivility and bullying should include specific aspects of nursing academia and the preparation of new nurses”.

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What do they expect?  A comparison of student expectations and outcomes of undergraduate research experiences

What do they expect? A comparison of student expectations and outcomes of undergraduate research experiences

The big challenges facing nursing students today have permanent effects on us all as patients. Nursing students need to be able to value the relevance, authority, and utility of nursing research for patient care through embedding research learning in both academic and practice-based settings. Students can be supported in learning how to access, understand, and appraise the authority of research through weaving these skills into enquiry-based learning. Furthermore, encouraging students to undertake research- based practice change projects can support research utilization and development skills.

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The Reality of Diabetes in Rural Mexico: A Nursing Student Perspective

The Reality of Diabetes in Rural Mexico: A Nursing Student Perspective

Students from six universities in Canada, Mexico, and the USA participated in a service learning exchange. In order to understand the needs of diabetes patients in rural Mexico three students from Canada and the USA trudged in the heat through the rough terrain to their homes. We used Omaha System signs/symptoms to collect interview data. The standardized language of the questionnaire allowed us to be aware of the interaction between traditional medical beliefs and the western medical model. Some of these challenges include maintaining the traditional family roles, controlling blood glucose levels without the appropriate medical equipment, and economic barriers. One patient was responsible for both caring for her eight young children and working in the fields to put food on the table. Additionally, she was in a constant hypoglycemic state causing her to faint in the fields. We also visited a visually impaired man that was distraught because he needed to rely on others for help in a machismo society. He said “While living in New York City, I was a victim of a robbery. I was so afraid because I thought I was going to die and as a result I got diabetes.” Though some may find this comment strange, it is a common theory among the rural population in Mexico. We will always remember the many Mexican speculate that eating bread absorbs the scare and thus prevents diabetes. This experience gave us a glimpse of the harsh reality that these people face everyday coping with diabetes.

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Nursing Students Readying to Save Lives 

Nursing Students Readying to Save Lives 

Recognizing the findings in a patient with an impending myocardial infarction (MI) and intervening appropriately is essential for healthcare providers in improving patient outcomes.

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Mythology 

Mythology 

Article pertaining to mythology as related to nursing and the RN student.

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Keeping a Positive Outlook: My Clinical Experience as a Student Nurse 

Keeping a Positive Outlook: My Clinical Experience as a Student Nurse 

My experience in my senior year clinical preceptorship was without a doubt unique but I feel its uniqueness was in what I made of it, something every nursing student can do for themselves. If there is one lesson to gain from reading about my experiences it should be that the success of a clinical, whether a preceptorship or group experience, is entirely what the student makes of it.

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Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 

Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 

Research shows that turnover rates are high for new nurse graduates as a result of a stressful work environment coupled with inadequate support during the transition from student to professional practice. This article seeks to define the problem of new nurse graduate retention, examine strategies implemented by specific organizations that decreased turnover rates of new graduate nurses, and offer recommendations for the new graduate nurse about to enter professional practice.

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Clinical Nursing: Keeping Your Skills In-Tune 

The primary duty of every nurse is the assessment of a patient’s physical and emotional well-being. This basic-skill learned in the very first nursing class is the one skill and primary duty the nurse will use every day with his and/or her patients.

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Can I Depend On You? 

an LPN Instructor at East Central Technical College in Douglas, Georgia requires an experience for her nursing students.

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Are Changing Demographics Influencing the Trend of Nursing Curricula in Massachusetts BSN Programs? 

An RN Journal article -a nursing student was interested to know why, with the rapidly growing population of older Americans, there was not a stand alone course related to the care of the geriatric patient offered within her SON curriculum. What were the barriers that failed to allow a stand-alone course for geriatrics?

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