Latest Entries Journal of Nursing

A common link in the modifiable risk factors for severe COVID-19

A common link in the modifiable risk factors for severe COVID-19

Certain comorbidities, such as hypertension and diabetes, are often diagnosed once a patient has been hospitalized with COVID. Current thought suggests that these people had the medical condition, but it was not diagnosed until they were hospitalized. In this article I offer a reason as to why that may be. Based on this perspective, I further stress the importance of health maintenance in disease prevention.

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Ethical considerations for the mentally unwell in a global pandemic

Ethical considerations for the mentally unwell in a global pandemic

A case review on a mentally Ill patient during the covid pandemic.

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Evidenced Based Guidelines: Ischemic Heart Disease

Evidenced Based Guidelines: Ischemic Heart Disease

Evidenced based guidelines to provide primary prevention and improve correct diagnosis and treatment.

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Case Study: A Systematic Approach to Early Recognition and Treatment of Sepsis

Case Study: A Systematic Approach to Early Recognition and Treatment of Sepsis

The term sepsis is often misunderstood. The public and often healthcare workers are unaware of the severity and high mortality rates this infection process has upon the world. Sepsis has vague symptoms that make diagnosis difficult. Often, sepsis is diagnosed in the later stages, when more obvious yet severe symptoms occur. This case study discusses a female who presents to the emergency department with sepsis secondary to pneumonia. Over the course of three days, the patient’s health quickly deteriorates, demonstrating the rapid progression of sepsis. Clinical findings, such as vitals signs, lab abnormalities, and symptoms of sepsis are discussed. The term bundle of care is presented to educate the reader on the golden standard of care for treatment of sepsis. This case study intends to increase community awareness and education to health care providers as well as providing an evidenced-based treatment guideline. More education and raised awareness will help prevent a deadly yet treatable infectious process.

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What Can We Do to Promote Professional Socialization in Nursing?

What Can We Do to Promote Professional Socialization in Nursing?

Transitioning to a new work setting is challenging for many nurses regardless of the time spent in practice. Promoting professional socialization, through mentoring and precepting, helps to facilitate a smooth transition. Effective mentoring, using role play, reflective exercises, and debriefing, provides the transitioning nurse the opportunity to self-actualize his or her potential in the new work environment. The use of Benner’s Novice to Expert Theory and Duchscher's Stages of Transition Theory as a basis for mentorship enhances safety and quality in the provision of care.

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Mystery Diagnosis: Recognizing Serotonin Syndrome

Mystery Diagnosis: Recognizing Serotonin Syndrome

Serotonin syndrome (SS) is a rare condition that is believed to be induced by ingestion of serotonergic medications, leading to an increased serotonin level. Although many medications are thought to be responsible, some of the more common are antidepressants and opioids. There are no definitive tests to confirm SS, therefore diagnosis is based on clinical findings and can be somewhat difficult. A triad of symptoms, neuromuscular hyperactivity, altered mental status, and autonomic hyperactivity, are considered the hallmark signs, but are not present in all cases. Symptoms can vary from mild and almost undetectable to severe and life threatening. Three diagnostic systems are currently utilized to assist with diagnosis if SS is suspected: the Hunter, Sternbach, and Radomski criteria. A diagnosis of SS should prompt discontinuation of the suspected offending agent. Increased awareness of this issue is needed, including symptoms and risk factors, so that the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) may promptly recognize and diagnosis this condition to avoid further complications. Completing a thorough history and physical, along with accurate medication reconciliation can assist the APRN in identifying high risk patients. While there is still so much about SS that remains unknown, current information and education on this issue will ensure the APRN is providing safe and high-quality care. Databases utilized were CINAHL, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. These databases provide access to numerous nursing, biomedical, and scientific journals and were useful in locating up-to-date, peer reviewed research on this subject.

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Importance of Interprofessional Collaboration, Communication and Teambuilding,

Importance of Interprofessional Collaboration, Communication and Teambuilding,

Collaboration is especially significant in the healthcare environment to meet the increasingly complex demands of patients with multiple co-morbidities. This article discusses the importance of interprofessional collaboration, communication, and team building.

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Magnet Recognition: Is the Designation worth the Journey?

Magnet Recognition: Is the Designation worth the Journey?

Currently, only eight percent of hospitals nationwide hold the title of Magnet Recognition (AHA, Fast Facts on US Hospitals, 2019) and even less receive consecutive designations. Eight percent is a marginally small number, especially when it comes to credentialing hospitals as havens for quality patient outcomes and centers of nursing excellence. The process of becoming a Magnet designated hospital is complex and grueling; requiring submissions of data, site visits, and taxes hospital resources in doing so. What then is this rare designation, and how does it improve both patient outcomes and nursing quality? Ultimately, does the designation provide benefit to those who obtain it?

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Cardiomyopathy: A Closer Look at the Disease

Cardiomyopathy: A Closer Look at the Disease

Heart disease is a wide term used for a variety of diseases that affect the heart. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Cardiomyopathy is one of the types of heart disease that affects about 50,000 Americans annually. There are four types of cardiomyopathy: dilated, hypertrophic, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, 2007). This article will detail the different types of cardiomyopathy as well as the causes, treatment, sign and symptoms, diagnostic procedures and prevention. It will also cover ways to live with cardiomyopathy and end of life care.

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Love hate relationship in nursing

My experience from a person who hated nursing to emerging as a qualified nurse.

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Rapid Response Team to the Rescue

Rapid response team purpose is to initiate immediate measures before patient deteriorates further and to educate the staff on activating the staff the Rapid response team

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Impact of Language Barriers on Patient Safety

This paper discusses how linguistic differences can contribute to patient adverse outcomes and the role of health care providers in mitigating the impact.

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Nurses Eat Their Young; An Insight Into Systematic Hazing and its Implications on Patient Care

I am a nursing student that worked as a CNA for six years. I was inspired to write this from my own experiences that I have encountered while working in the field of nursing.

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Perioperative Fasting Guidelines as it relates to ERAS Protocol: Exploring Existing Modalities

For the longest time, any procedure requiring anesthesia was accompanied with perioperative instructions mandating a fast from midnight until the surgery. However, anyone that’s lived long enough has learned to understand that just because something has been done for a long time, it doesn’t mean it should be done for the rest of time. With technological advances and improvements in research, medical practices and patient instructions should evolve. Here, we’ll explore the rationale behind the old modality as it pertains to preoperative care and instructions, what’s changed in research and technology, and finally, what new modalities should be learned, taught, and implemented.

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Retro-Clival Hematoma In The Pediatric Emergency Department

An unusual presentation of Retro-clival hematoma in the pediatric population

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Electroconvulsive Therapy in Pediatrics

The use of ECT for the pediatric population requires significant application of professional ethics in order for the process to be smooth and successful. Experts who administer ECT on psychiatric patients ought to consider the right of the patient to choose the type of treatment they want after being equipped with all the pros and cons related to the process.

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Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections

Evidence based practice for implementation of central line bundles to decrease central line associated bloodstream infections.

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Knowing Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

Transfusion-related acute lung injury occurs within 6 hours post transfusion where patient develops shortness of breath without signs of pulmonary overload in chest xray. With evidence of hypoxemia / low oxygen saturation.

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Expanding the BSN Workforce

The article discusses the benefits of a BSN prepared workforce as it relates to patient health outcomes. It also addresses the decision process for ADN prepared nurses as they review RN to BSN programs in anticipation of completing their BSN.

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A Husband's Difficult Decision

A husband's difficult decision regarding his critically ill wife and DNR status

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SXU Ranked No. #1 by U. S. News & World Report’s “Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs”

Saint Xavier University’s (SXU) School of Nursing recently earned the #1 ranking by U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 “Best Online Graduate Nursing Programs”. SXU’s School of Nursing has ranked in the top three online graduate nursing programs five consecutive years. This is the third time the program has been ranked #1 in those five years.

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Utilizing the “Teach Back” Method Approach in Reducing Medical Errors in Patients After Discharge.

This article is about the utilization of the teach-back method in reducing medical error and readmission with patients after discharge.

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Compassion in Nursing; the “Gift that Keeps on Giving"

This article describes how, even in a busy recovery room, nurses who show compassion while caring for their patients, enrich their patients' experience by making a meaningful connection with them.

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Protein Consumption and Hydration in Competitive High School Students

The objective of this article is to provide a resource for nurses, coaches and athletes on proper consumption of protein and hydration status. According to the Institute of Medicine’s Dietary Reference Intakes, the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of protein for both men and women is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day. The average athlete consumes more than the recommended amount of protein with protein supplements. The combination of increased protein consumption along with inadequate hydration can lead to short and long term consequences. Consequences include, acute and chronic kidney injury, rhabdomylosis, and electrolyte imbalances. Nurses play a vital role in primary prevention and education strategies in regards to proper nutrition.

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Preventative Community Health Improvement plan

Preventative community health improvement plan to reduce the number of cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

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What Are The Effects Of Floating to Nurses And Patient Care

This article will explore how floating affects nurses and what management can do to help nurses relieve the stress, anxiety, and dissatisfaction of the nurses with the health care system.

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Managing the Inevitability of Change

Change is inevitable. Whether we are changing our minds, our clothes, or a channel on television, we know change happens… and we are fine with it, when we are the ones enacting it. However, what about when change happens to us? This article explores the effects of a hospital’s unit closing on staff – the good, the bad, and the ugly – and seeks to identify ways to mitigate the bad and ugly emotional responses, and hopefully explore means of increasing the good (by both hospital management practice, and individual mindset). A unit in one of south Florida leading hospital serves as a case study as we delve into this topic.

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Everything you need to know about Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

This article is about everything you need to know about Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. What is CFS, what are its causes, the symptoms and the remedies?

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Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Overview and treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage

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Disease Preveniton and Health Promotion Screening: Breast Cancer

Current risk factors for breast cancer, screening recommendations, and latest diagnostic assessments.

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A Review of the Treatment for Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

Common treatments reviewed for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting, mostly in the PACU phase of care.

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The Calling - A Poem

Poem about nursing

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The power of saying "Thank You"

The power of saying "Thank You." in Nursing

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Patient’s Wishes and Dying with Dignity

After the palliative care made rounds on the afternoon shift, they were able to get a hold of Mr. D’s only relative: a niece who was not close with him but apparently had called the ambulance for him to come to the hospital.

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RN's informed about skills of Occupational Therapist & Physical Therapists

Registered Nurses do not differentiate between the applied skills of the Occupational Therapist and Physical Therapist, nor do Registered Nurses realize it is the Occupational Therapist who is responsible for prescribing patients with developmental disabilities the type and configuration of an appropriate wheelchair.

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New Innovation for Chronic Kidney Disease

This body of work looks at new and innovative treatments that are being researched and developed for the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

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The Virtual Professor

Today many colleges are increasingly using online approach to provide effective and easily accessible education to attract students from wide geographic areas and increase enrollment. The virtual professor is constantly required to monitor and supervise students who are not visible in a virtual learning community.

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Regional anesthesia; A quick introduction

This article offers a small introduction and overview regarding regional anesthesia. You have nerves that run all through your body. Nerves provide a pathway for impulses to communicate between the brain and other parts of your body. Not only do your nerves tell your muscles to move, they tell your brain when something is painful.

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Post-Fall Care Nursing Algorithm

Post-Fall care practices are an integral aspect to patient care. As we care for older adults it is important to consider post-fall care practices.

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Factors Influencing Nurse Medication Errors

This article explores the medication errors and the phenomena of nurse distractions. Nurses are intimately involved in the medication administration process. Even though the parameters of selection, dosing, compounding, and dispensing medication remain under the purview of other allied health professionals, the nurse represents the last safety checkpoint between the medication and the patient and efforts should be directed toward removing obstacles which are negatively impacting this process. It has long been suspected that nursing distractions whether by patient, family, coworkers or others, are facilitating the occurrence of errors in the hospital setting. There are practices which are discussed which may ameliorate this threat to some extent if employed consistently and judiciously.

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Improving the clinical experience of working with undergraduate nursing students; a team approach.

This article emphasizes the value of working together in training the future nurses, and suggests strategies and tools to assist in the process. Bringing quality and safety to nursing education in the classroom and clinical is of high importance. Staff nurses play a key role in the clinical preparation and success of the student nurse. Faculty, preceptors, students and the system at large can be more successful if working together to reach the learning objectives and goals. Designated educational units (DEU) are an example of improved clinical teaching/learning environments, but every clinical unit can participate and practice quality regardless to the formal structure and protocal of an established DEU. Understanding that the staff nurse plays a significant role in mentoring the future nurse generation is a reason enough to see working with students is a necessity rather than a burden.

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Recovering from Tragedy and Surgery

A story of a patient recovering from surgery and a tragic event.

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Let Volunteers Answer The Call

How volunteers take pressure off of Nurses

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Medical Equipment

This article is about receiving a patient postop who required oxygen. The respiratory therapist had disconnected the oxygen and placed onto the beside portable O2 tank to administer a nebulizer treatment. After nebulizer treatment was completed the oxygen was not moved back to the wall and tank went empty. The patients oxygen dropped.

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Multimodal Analgesia: Ways to Take Away the Pain

This article addresses ways to use multimodal analgesia such as opioids, anti-inflammatories, regional anesthesia, etc to achieve greater pain control in patients.

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Current and Future Educational Challenges for the Nurse Educator

This article explores current trends in nursing education.

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Characteristics of various Nursing Paradigms and nursing theories within the Totality and Simultaneity Paradigms

This paper is an attempt to explore the conceptual basis and characteristics of various paradigms in nursing. It will exemplify how nursing theories and models fit within a certain nursing paradigmatic classification. Therefore, this paper will also present an example of how various nursing theories fit within the totality and simultaneity paradigms.

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Is Reform Needed in License Disciplinary Procedure?

Discussion of disciplinary proceedings in California and the need for changing harsh disciplinary standards.

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The Importance of Educating in Real-Time

Working in the acute care hospital, provides many opportunities to learn. As healthcare workers, we must recognize and act quickly on any situation that puts a patient at risk. A recent situation occurred in the hospital that required both the need to act and to provide education in real-time.

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Polypharmacy Mitigation: A Lifetime of Education.

An informational article on the issue of paolypharmacy and medication redundancy in todays healthcare and the use of education over the lifespan as a corrective measure.

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Building Trusting Work Relationships in Healthcare and Beyond

In an effort to help leaders in various types of healthcare organizations learn how to build trust and strong work relationships within their organizations, eight chief nursing officers (CNOs) from healthcare organizations throughout California were interviewed. All the CNOs were asked the same structured questions. A review and analysis of those interviews revealed the following five dimensions as key ingredients: authenticity, work ethics, communicating and sharing news, history and reputation, and creating a supportive and empowering environment. Our results include the definitions of trust by the eight CNOs, the Four R’s of building trustworthy relationships and an acronym of SHARE. We discuss what CNOs describe as “trust blockers,” actions a CNO can take that would break the employee’s trust. The results of this research can be used in a variety of ways including incorporating them into leadership development training aiming at strengthening their personal leadership styles and improving workplace environments by creating and role modeling a more open communication culture.

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Night Shift Nursing: A Policy Proposal

Night shift nurses face many obstacles in achieving adequate work-life balance. Additionally, there are ramifications for night shift nurses in that health problems may appear after extended time working the night shift. This research puts forth some possibilities for changing this culture and making nursing and nursing care safer for patients and caregivers.

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Health and Wellbeing: A Student Nurse's Perspective

This essay discusses health and well-being as multifaceted concepts and explores how my health and wellbeing has been affected since becoming a student nurse. This essay also discusses the importance of maintaining good health and wellbeing in relation to self-care and patient care.

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Young and Healthy in the PACU

Some patients in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) are young and or very healthy. These qualities sometimes give the impression that there will not be complications from surgery or anesthesia. This is not always the case. These patients may be overlooked for experiencing complications because they are healthy. I have seen a number of patients who have no health problems experience side effects from anesthesia and surgery.

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Attitude Matters

Even with a shared set of values and behaviors, we cannot underestimate the nurse’s attitude towards: others, their patients, their co-workers, and the organization they work for and towards the profession of nursing.

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"Just a nurse"

Being a nurse is sufficient...think outside of the box

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Respect: A Duty One to Another

In a time of nursing strikes, it is imperative that we respect each other as a profession. This articles explores the roles of staff and strike nurses.

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Preparation of Faculty in the Era of Educational Technology

While online nursing education programs are on the increase, faculty is constantly challenged to teach effectively in online environment. Preparation of nursing faculty in educational technology provides avenues for successful online teaching.

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When "Old Dogs" go Back to School

I went back to college at the age of 62. Being an "old dog", I was not computer savvy, so taking classes mostly on-line was quite challenging. I believe that my trials and triumphs evidenced in this article, will encourage nurses, especially older nurses, to go back to school for their BSN.

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My Teaching Learning Philosophy

My philosophy of teaching learning revolves around the profound belief of Peter (1965). I strongly believe there are certain responsibilities of teachers to make teaching learning effective. First of all, educators must create a difference between education and teaching. Secondly, teaching learning process must be student centered. It must provide opportunity to students to learn according to their interest and needs. Further, students are also responsible for their own learning. Based on my teaching learning philosophy, I can recommend to bring immediate change in our teaching learning environment we need power and authority which now I can bring as a nurse educator.

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Do Nurses Need Biology?

As Biology instructors for nursing students, it is an honour to contribute to laying down a foundation in Biology for future nurses. One common question that has emerged among nursing students is “Why do I need to know Biology if I’m going to become a nurse?” We have wrestled with this question for some time. How does one generate an appropriate response to this question? How does one instill within a student the passion for learning Biology? How can one emphasize how valuable understanding Biology will become in the workplace? We hope to raise some interesting discussion and awareness about a topic that we have spent countless hours deliberating amongst ourselves and our colleagues.

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Six Sigma and Healthcare Finances

This article is a brief primer on Six Sigma methodology and its impact on healthcare finance and nursing.

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Are Canadian Nurse Practitioners here to stay?

This paper outlines articles that take a closer look into the role of NPs in the Canadian health care system, and how their roles have evolved in response to an ever-changing health care environment.

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Interactive Technology is Shaping Patient Education and Experience

This article describes the Nurse Informatics participation in adopting technology in patient care and nursing workflow. Healthcare settings now integrate electronic medication prescribing, tele-health, online appointment scheduling and mobile laboratories where informatics nurses are essential in guaranteeing that the computerized solutions interface with each other. In order to accomplish information related activities, informatics nurses must synchronize and exchange significant clinical and technical information with the goal of supporting and coordinating safe, effective patient care and assuring an efficient workflow. A strong foundation for addressing the challenges of electronic documentation is the informatics nurses capability to understand and direct the balance of patient care with the technology systems and organizational structure that supports this balance. In order to guarantee a successful implementation of a computer system while managing patient care is to integrate nurses’ perceptions, beliefs, and knowledge in the use of new technology and how nurses implement this technology into their daily nursing practice.

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Bedside Reporting: Embracing the Need for Clinical Change

Communication is an integral part of nursing care. The implementation of bedside reporting practices provides an avenue for best practices and improved outcomes.

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9 Steps to an Exceptionally Happy Day at Work

Nurses are practical and purposeful. When your job is managing the well-being of other people it can be tough to put yourself in the schedule. Most nurses I know find caring for everyone else easy and the very thought of taking care of themselves may seem selfish. Yet, to achieve true balance one must learn to receive in the cycle of giving.

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Patients First

A brief article about a patient that inspired me.

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Women and Homelessness

Women and homelessness is a great concern that affects the global policy and health determinants to improve health. This case study is a glimpse of the cultural class as it revolves around the lives of mostly White homeless mothers, attending to both everyday lives and cultural norms while exploring and interpreting their interdependencies.

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Beginnings of a Lifetime

Inspirational article about becoming a nurse and 38 years later.

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Yoga and the Benefits to Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

A leading cause of decreased quality of life and debility due to diminished gas exchange, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) progresses slowly with no known cure. The overall effect on other systems and the emotional toll placed on these patients makes activities of daily living exceedingly impossible to manage. The purpose of this article is to conduct a review of the literature to determine the benefits derived from practicing yoga on one’s quality of life and pulmonary functions for those diagnosed with COPD with a special focus on the author’s current practice in home health. In addition The Yoga Sutra and Bhagavad Gita will be reviewed to offer a holistic approach to care.

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An Interesting Assignment to Learn about Mental Illness

Today, there exist so many various kinds of media including: books, magazines, newspapers, TV, movies, videos, smart phones, computer software and the uncountable sites one can access on the internet. The media is constantly bombarding us with so many messages many of which are subliminal or ostentatious. Subliminal messages from media often suggest what we should buy, how we should act and who we should be friends with. A recent assignment for a psychology class required students to analyze their favorite cartoon characters for signs and symptoms of mental illness. When you assess and analyze some of our favorite childhood cartoon characters some of them display signs and symptoms of mental illness. This assignment engages students to learn about what defining characteristics to look for when assessing patients for mental disorders and just how subliminal messages especially those that are negative can be harmful to our well-being.

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When Doing The Right Thing Leads to the Wrong Results

Reprimanding nurses for medication errors contibutes to a culture of evasion and silence and does not address the reason behind the mistake.

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Provision of Effective Patient Education: A Learning Clinical Experience

Patient education is one of the fundamental aspects of holistic nursing care. It is the core responsibility of nurses to provide information to the patient and their families that is understandable and appropriate promoting awareness and optimal health. However, student nurses come across to various barriers in providing effective patient education, including decrease knowledge, lack of clear objectives and lack of clinical exposure. Similarly, I came across a similar situation in my community rotations in which I faced obstacles in educating the patient. There are several strategies that results in the provision of effective patient education, which includes, open communication style, written instructions, addressing barriers, formulating teaching plans, identifying learning styles and needs, and use of teaching aids. Therefore, through effective patient education nurses can increase the independence of client for self care in hospital as well as in community settings.

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Views of a New Graduate Nurse: The Value of Mentorship

A brief overview of one nurse's struggles as a new graduate nurse and the importance of improving the working environment for new nurse graduates.

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Anesthesia Awareness for Perioperative Nurses

Anesthesia awareness definition is an unexpected recall of events while under general anesthesia. The majority of the authors place the rate of anesthesia awareness to one patient out of every one thousand patients that experience some form of anesthesia awareness, however the exact mechanism of the pharmacological action of anesthetic is not clearly understood.

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Phlebotomy Basics For Nurses

The processes of phlebotomy are pivotal for patient care. Nurses may have to perform phlebotomy for their patient in various health care settings. Understanding the procedures, processes and reasons behind phlebotomy is the key to ensuring patient safety and positive patient outcomes.

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The Future of Nursing Education: Heading for a Major Crisis

Nursing as a practice and profession has experienced significant changes over the years. For instance, in the 1800s nurses were expected to be subservient to doctors. Just hear what the doctor who gave Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduation address: "Every nurse must remember that it is the attending physician's business to make a diagnosis of disease and hence that she should never hazard an opinion herself, under any circumstances." (Dr. Hooker, Springfield Hospital Annual Report, 1894). It would be interesting to know what the nursing faculty were thinking when they heard those words. Thankfully nurses during that era did not take the doctor’s advice and remained dedicated to advance and advocate for the profession of nursing. Around the same time that Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduating class were listening to their graduation address, Florence Nightingale along with other nurse advocates, were making incredible strides to implement nursing education. After the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale recognized and introduced the need for formal nursing education but the education was limited to basic nursing knowledge and skills. As a result of the Women’s Rights Movement in the 1900s, the idea of nursing as a profession evolved into a reality. As society’s healthcare needs changed, nursing education had to change to meet those needs. There were however, challenges each century faced when trying to ensure nursing education met society’s needs and today, the challenges faced are heading right for a major crisis.

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If You Work in a Hospital

I have been retired almost 3 years. Since retiring, I have been writing poetry instead of clinical records, reports, and contract proposals. Some of my poetry is about work. This poem reflects my experience working with nurses and doctors. I appreciate that poetry is not something you usually publish, however, like a photo, a poem is sometimes worth a thousand words. I think this poem is particularly relevant to the nurses who read your magazine, it has to do with bad days at work, and high expectations regarding patient outcomes.

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Disparities in Healthcare: Night Shift Nurses

Night shift nurses have been shown more likely to developing health issues than their day shift counterparts. Research over the past twenty years has led to the increasing conclusion that working night shifts for as little as eight shifts a month is associated with an increased likelihood to develop metabolic syndrome, a four-fold increase in the incidence of vascular events, and an increased chanceofdeveloping certain cancers.

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It is Time to Recruit More Men into the Profession of Nursing

It is Time to Recruit More Men into the Profession of Nursing

It is a benefit to have men working in the profession of nursing. We need to recruit more men into our nursing schools and to work in our healthcare institutions. Both male and female nurses bring different perspectives and benefits to the profession of nursing and to the patient’s they care for. The ability of men to negotiate and obtain higher salaries and positions in both administration and nursing specialty areas may serve as the impetus to elevate the entire nursing profession.

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The Forgotten Arm of Care

This article addresses the need for building a healthy work environment amidst the great emphasis on staffing to enhance care .

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Recognizing Heart Disease As a Women's Disease

Recognizing Heart Disease As a Women's Disease

There are noted differences among heart disease signs between men and women. Coronary Heart Disease can go unnoticed in women until they actually suffer a heart attack (NIH). Thus it is essential women are aware of the signs and symptoms, risk factors and healthy life style choices to prevent the devastating effects of heart disease. .Seeking early treatment when symptoms present is vital in improving the outcome of heart disease. It is important to teach women how to incorporate prevention strategies such as: consuming a healthy diet, maintaining optimum weight, maintaining an active lifestyle, maintaining both normal blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well as avoiding risk factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol limit their stress and any unhealthy behaviors that can lead to heart disease. Advocating for women and promoting education regarding health issues affecting women needs to be a priority so heart disease in women can be prevented and effectively treated.

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DNP and the Transformational Leaders

Transitioning advanced nursing practice to the doctoral level represents the natural evolution of the nursing profession and the right moves to ensure that nurses are prepared for the highest level of practice. Many advocates within the health care community (local and national authorities) are calling and welcoming the DNP role. National and state agencies, as a leading advocate for advanced practice nursing, understands greatly the contributions APNs (advanced practice nurse) make in the health care system as cost-effective providers. In addition, APNs have identified the need for additional education in the areas of evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems management, among others (Kaplan & Brown, 2009). This transition in the education of advanced practice nurses (APNs) is targeted to meet the increasingly complex needs of patients, families, and communities in a rapidly changing health care environment. DNP education also has the potential to transform the nursing profession in a variety of ways. These include: • Creating and adopting new roles in nursing practice • Increasing the influence of APNs in health care and policy development • Promoting leadership by APNs in their workplace and health care organizations • Enhancing the self-concept of advanced practice nurses • Strengthening inter-professional relationships and collaborations. (Kaplan & Brown, 2009; Swider, Levin, Cowell, Breakwell, Holland, & Wallinder, 2009) The DNP stimulates the creation and adoption of new advanced practice role. As health care becomes more complex, it will take such strong leadership criteria for nurses in all fields to continue to improve their own standards and the qualifications of others in the field (Kaplan & Brown, 2009).

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When does treatment become a life sentence?

This is an article based on patient's autonomy and dignity and the treatment process for those that have terminal illness.

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Nursing School Angel

How a patient in nursing school taught me how to deal with life and death

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Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Many professions have long since realized that a vast divide exists between the classroom and real-world practice and, thus, have mandated transitional programs. Nursing lacks such an intermediate step as part of its professional training although new nurses are pressured to provide both safe and competent care to increasingly complex patients without any transitional support (Pittman, Herrera, Bass, & Thompson, 2013). To fill this gap many institutions have begun to implement their own nurse-residency programs [NRPs]. However, since not all institutions have introduced such transition-into-practice programs barriers must exist. Nationwide, NRPs are shrouded in confusion, false perceptions, and concerns that hinder their implementation. This manuscript was compiled to help shed light onto the reasons for the lack of implementation and provides evidence of the importance and overall benefits for such programs. Personal perspectives are also provided from the authors in order to gain a nursing-student perspective about these transitional programs.

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Successful Aging For Canada's LGBT Older Adults

A research paper I wrote for my BSN degree regarding how health care services, particularly nursing can accommodate older adult members of the LGBT community and provide safe and best practice care.

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Medication Induced Bradycardia

In medicine there is never a playbook about how things are going to unfold and this is especially true when it comes to recovering from surgery and anesthesia. For example, sometimes as nurses we give medications to treat one symptom and unintentionally cause another.

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Quiet Servant

A poem dedicated to the service of community health nurses.

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Family Presence during a Code Blue

I have been a nurse in the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit for over five years now, and have participated in many code blues. Some of these situations are appropriate for family to attend and some are not. Each situation is assessed individually to determine the appropriateness of family presence. I had been caring for a young lady, Ms. R.V., who was an 18 year old that had received a heart transplant for a congenital heart defect when she was 13 years old. She was admitted to TGH to be placed on the heart transplant list again, as her transplanted heart had been failing for months. Due to the failing heart, other organs began to also fail. R.V. had gone into heart and kidney failure and required continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for continuous dialysis treatment since her blood pressure was continuously low. I had cared for R.V. for three days so far and had gotten to know her and her mother very well. R.V. and her mother were extremely close. Her mother brought her in dinner as often as she could and visited on her days off. Because her daughter had been in the hospital for so long, the patient’s mother had to return to work. She would work during the day and visit in the evening. This particular day, R.V. was stating how excited she was to see her mom that evening, and her mom was going to bring her a salad from Panera Bread. I could sense her excitement in her voice and facial expressions, although she had very little energy to spare. Around shift change, my patient began to feel “different”, and state that “something isn’t right”. I immediately took her vital signs, laid her back down in bed, and called her doctors. I also called her mother to see how close she was to the hospital. Not long after R.V. stated she felt “different”, her oxygen saturations plummeted, she turned blue, stopped breathing, and a code blue was called. With many doctors and nurses at the bedside, CPR was performed for at least 15 minutes before R.V.’s mom arrived. She was very distressed and anxious to see her daughter. One of the doctors felt that she should not be around to witness the CPR on her daughter. I, on the other hand, stated that R.V. and her mom are very close and that she should be allowed to stand in the back to be with her daughter, an 18 year old child. This particular doctor was one that strictly attends code blue situations and had no previous relationship with this patient or her mother. I calmly expressed that in this situation, the mother of R.V. should be at the bedside of her daughter if she wants to because her daughter looked as though she would not survive the code situation. R.V.’s mother was not in the way, and she stood at the head of her daughter and whispered into her ear. Once R.V.’s primary doctors arrived, they agreed that the mother should stay in the room if she wanted to be with her daughter. R.V. did not survive the code. Her mom, however, was able to be with her daughter as she passed and held her hand as she took her last breath. As heartbreaking as this scenario was, the patient’s mother thanked me for allowing her the privilege of being with her daughter as she finally got peace and can “rest now”. Although not all code blue situations are deemed appropriate for family presence, the nurse and care providers should assess each family and patient separately to determine what is best for the patient and the family.

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Reflections of Nurse Educator

Teaching is an art. Some people are born teachers while others acquire the skill. To be a great teacher, one has to have a sense of humor and be very flexible. Teachers will never teach to gain monetary reward. However, they will teach to achieve the best reward - satisfaction that they have an impact on the education of the leaders of the world, the training of CEOs, and the success of new breed of professionals. Teaching is a noble profession.

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Prescriptive Authority for Nurse Practitioners

The physician shortage in primary care, plus the growth of nurse practitioners and increasing need for access to health care, creates a necessity for more autonomous nurse practitioners. However, current restrictions on nurse practitioners, particularly prescription regulations for controlled substances, limit what practitioners can do for patients. These restrictions also increase wait times for patients and have the potential to increase liability claims as physicians prescribe medications for patients they have not adequately evaluated. Nurse practitioners have proven to be a safe, quality, and cost saving approach to primary care. To meet the growing needs for patients, nurse practitioners must have the ability to prescribe controlled substances in all 50 states.

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Is Nursing a Profession

Professions require that educational preparedness must be within institutions of higher learning. In order to be held out as a profession, an individual must be able to practice autonomously within their scope of practice. Nurses have an identified scope of practice mandated by a particular state board of nursing. A profession has a code of ethics which is recognized across numerous levels of practice within the profession. The culture and norms of a profession are easily recognized by the professionals who make-up the body.

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Why Do Nurses Eat Their Young?

This article discusses issues related to new nurses regarding bullying and how the problem can be solved.

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Barriers to Patients Undergoing Methadone Maintenance Therapy

Methadone maintenance therapy is one method utilized to combat opioid addiction and is an effective treatment in the abstinence from opiates. The purpose of this article is to communicate comprehensive information to healthcare providers about methadone as a medication, and the treatment guidelines of maintenance programs in the hopes of diminishing the stigma attached to methadone maintenance therapy. Through a comprehensive literature review, information regarding mechanism of action, maintenance therapy program guidelines, different barriers to treatment, and how to overcome these barriers were collected and reviewed.

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A Purpose

In 1st grade I lost my best friend to Leukemia, which made me realize I wanted to be a nurse. I want to specialize in pediatric oncology because my cousin touched my life even at a young age.

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History of Ebola and Nursing

Many healthcare providers and the public are paying very special attention to the outbreak of the Ebola Virus in West Africa and the subsequent infection of the two critical care nurses at Texas. Many healthcare professionals expressed their confusion about the virus and the seeming stigmatization of nurses. Currently with the outbreak in Texas, nurses and other healthcare providers were encountered the same dilemmas as Central Africa nurses years ago.

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PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS AFFECTING EATING HABITS AMONG NURSES IN GENERAL HOSPITAL

Abstract Background: Obesity and overweight are more frequent in workers working in shift and psychological distress increased among working women in Malaysia. A supportive manager and a flexible working time are linked with a decrease of the conflicts between family and work. Objectives: The purpose of the research was to investigate the patterns of eating habit and its relationship factors, with focus on psychological factor among nurses. Methods: A study of 100 nurses was conducted in medical-surgical wards of a public hospital. Data was collected using a cross sectional study using a convenience sampling (non probability). A self-administered questionnaire on eating habits was used, and analyzed using SPSS (version 21). Results: A majority of (89%) participants was from a female group while a number of male participants are only (11%). Majority (86%) responded they ate because of feeling happy followed by eating because of feeling lonely (80%) and most of them did not perceived that they have a healthy eating habits (53%). Conclusions: The findings indicated that employers need to identify physical workload that is acceptable to avoid risks of unhealthy eating habits and monitor the availability of healthy food in the worksite. Keywords: Eating habits,Psychological Factors, working in shifts.

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Clinical Considerations for Patients with Active Clostridium difficile Infection

This article addresses the probable significant environmental Clostridium difficile (c. difficile) spore contamination that occurs when patients with active C. difficile infection are utilizing low air loss mattress therapy. We site published works that have proven environmental contamination exists in the absence of low air loss therapy. We assert that by virtue of the mechanism of action of low air loss surfaces, significantly increased environmental soiling is inevitable. Therefore, the risk of spreading infection is significantly increased. We are calling for additional research to determine the extent of increased contamination that occurs when low air low therapy is used on patients with active C difficile infection.

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"Phase 1; Exploration of paramedic protocol for field IV insertion" and "Field IVs: To Replace or Not"

This is a two-phase study. We are willing to have either two different phases for you to publish, or combine our two studies into one manuscript for publication. HURCA Abstract Caitlin Wright, Senior II Nursing Faculty Advisor: Dr. Deborah Behan, PhD, RN-BC Phase 1; Exploration of paramedic protocol for field IV insertion Current protocol at a south central hospital in the U.S. requires nurses to change field IVs within 24-48 hours. Changing IVs in-hospital result in patient duress and nurse time loss. This article reports data from the IV Insertion Protocol Survey and the Paramedic Educator Survey. These surveys attempt to identify paramedic protocol and practice related to IV insertion and aseptic technique. Further, the surveys explore paramedic education regarding IV insertion. Surveys were hand-delivered, participants were invited to participate in the anonymous survey, and data were then analyzed using RemarkOffice. The results suggest paramedics are educated on the use of aseptic technique and that paramedics clean the IV site unless circumstances such as limited space or patient acuity prevent proper cleansing. Eighty-eight percent of participants report following a protocol, 64% almost never/never use hand sanitizer, and 83% of educators said that paramedics are not instructed to use hand sanitizer. In summary, paramedics use aseptic technique, which suggests that field IVs should not need to be replaced within 24-48 hours after a patient’s hospital admission. PURPOSE STATEMENT The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not the paramedic providers to this South Central region of the United States follow a protocol for IV insertions that is equivalent to hospital protocol. PHASE 1; EXPLORATION OF PARAMEDIC PROTOCOL FOR FIELD IV INSERTION OUTLINE Introduction • Background o Some studies indicate that IV insertions are periodically performed without maintenance of aseptic technique. • Problem and Purpose o Current protocol at a South Central hospital in the United States requires nurses to change all field IVs within 24-48 hours after a patient’s admission. o If paramedics are complying with a protocol requiring site cleansing before IV insertion, changing the IV in-hospital may not be necessary. o The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not the paramedic providers to this South Central region of the United States follow a protocol for IV insertions that is equivalent to hospital protocol. Materials and Methods • IV Insertion Protocol Survey and the Paramedic Educator Survey were created for the study. • The survey is a 10 item survey using a likert scale to determine paramedic practice and adherence to IV insertion protocol. • A pre-written script was read before each survey. • The survey was given to each paramedic, paramedic educator, and paramedic supervisor who chose to participate. Results • Eighty-eight percent said they follow a protocol for IV insertion. • Eighty-nine percent of participants reported to always use aseptic technique and the remaining 11% reported almost always. • Nine percent of participants always use hand sanitizer before inserting IVs in the field, and 64% almost never/never use hand sanitizer. • Certain circumstances in the field may not allow for aseptic technique to be used. • The Paramedic Educator Survey results showed that 100% of the educators teach cleaning of the skin before IV insertion. Discussion • The EMS providers that we surveyed do not have a protocol that is equivalent to hospital IV insertion protocols; they follow algorhythms. • The results from the Paramedic Educator Survey suggest that paramedics are taught to use aseptic technique when inserting a peripheral IV • The group felt that it was impractical to use hand sanitizer before applying gloves. • Educators did not express the desire to begin teaching about the use of hand sanitizer. • There is no form or official process of communicating whether or not the IV was placed with proper aseptic technique • Future study recommendations: hand-off report between paramedic and receiving personnel, follow IVs in-hospital to see if there is a need for replacement Conclusion • EMS providers in this South Central region of the United States have been well educated on aseptic technique and IV insertion. • Change of protocol could better manage nurse time, as well as provide substantial health benefits for the patient. ABSTRACT FIELD IVS: TO REPLACE OR NOT En-Dien Liao, B.S. in Nursing The University of Texas at Arlington, 2014 Faculty Mentor: Deborah Behan, Ph.D., RN-BC Patients admitted to the emergency room via Emergency Medical Services with a field-established peripheral intravenous catheter (IV) were observed for 96 hours while in the hospital. Currently, many nurses restart the IV upon admission because they feel an IV started by a paramedic while in the field needs to be changed within 48 hours of hospital admission. The purpose of the study was to determine if field IVs started by paramedics could be utilized after patient admission to the hospital. Each day, observations of the IV site were recorded for signs of redness, swelling, and pain or tenderness, which would indicate the IV needed to be restarted. Results suggest that IVs started in the field by a paramedic in the ambulance may last up to 96 hours before they need to be changed. PURPOSE STATEMENT The purpose of this study was to determine if the field EMS IVs can last up to 96 hours without being changed by the nurse in the acute care setting. This study is aimed at identifying the aftereffects of IVs inserted in the field and determining whether or not pre-hospital IVs need to be replaced in the acute hospital setting within 24-48 hours of patient arrival. OUTLINE Introduction Purpose • The purpose of this study was to determine if the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) peripheral intravenous catheters (IVs) can last up to 96 hours. Background/Literature Review • Lawrence and Lauro (1988)- field-started IVs are 2.88 times more likely than hospital-started IVs to develop complications within 24 hours of insertion. • Lee et al. (2009)- In the hospital setting, IV catheter replacement time can be extended from 48 up to 96 hours. • Wright (2011)- evaluation of aseptic technique used by EMS personnel. • 88% of EMS follows a protocol for IV insertion • 100% always or almost always use aseptic technique when inserting field IVs • All paramedic educators were found to teach cleaning of the skin with alcohol prior to IV insertion Method • On random days, the researcher went to the emergency room (ER) and identified patients who arrived by EMS with an EMS established IV. • After admission orders, the patient was followed to room. • Verbal consent obtained, and patients were followed for the next four days • Data were collected each day on the following criteria: Site, redness, swelling, and pain/tenderness. Result • Total participants: 62 (134 measurements across 4 days) • One participant withdrew, and another participant passed away IV Location: Within the 134 measurements, 37 of the measurements were for an IV located in the right arm (33.9%). Seventy-two of the measurements were for an IV located in the left arm (66.1%). IV Redness: Out of 134 measurements, 12 measurements had redness (9%) and 110 measurements did not have redness (82.1%). IV Pain: Out of the 134 measurements, seven measurements were reported as pain or tenderness (5.2%) and 114 reported no pain or tenderness (85.1%). IV Swelling: Out of the 134 measurements, seven had signs of swelling (5.2%) and 110 measurements did not (85.8%). Discontinued Reasons ranked from highest to lowest: 36 due to discharge (64.3%), 6 to leaking (10.7%), 5 to policy removal (8.9%), 5 to pulled-out (8.9%), 2 to infiltration (3.6%), 1 to bruising (1.8%), and 1 to poor location (1.8%). Conclusion • EMS IVs may remain longer than 24 hours and up to 96 hours before they need to be changed. • Potential benefits : • Better quality of care for patients • More time saved for nurses from restarting IVs • Decreased cost to hospitals from reduced length of stays in hospitals. • Majority of patients were left handed • Inconsistency between system policy and actual bedside practice. Further education from nurse educators may be needed on the hospital’s IV policies. • Future Research: correlation between IV needle size and IV leakiness. • Wright (2011) found 82% of paramedics to use 18 gauge needles • Leaking was found to be the 2nd highest cause for IV discontinued

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Cultural Diversity

Cultural Diversity plays a very important role and will continue to play an even greater role as we move into a more diversified world. We live in an era of constant change and transformation, which in return paves the way for cultural transparency. The U.S. population consists of members from different racial and ethnic groups and depending on their geographical location, they can either be more or less concentrated.

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Bearers of Light

A poem about nurses. The bearers of light in the darkness of patients' lives.

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Abnormal Gait in Toddlers

Disorders of the skeletal system can develop as a result of abnormal growth and development due to hereditary or congenital abnormalities (Grossman, 2013). Three possible diagnosis that could result in a three year old child that is having a noted abnormal gait is Torsional Deformities, Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip and Legg-Calveʹ-Perthes disease.

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Diabetes Insipidus

ABSTRACT: Diabetes Insipidus (DI) is a deficiency response to the antidiuretic hormone (ADH) also known as vasopressin. There are two types of vasopressin (V) receptors known as V1 and V2 in which the V1 receptors located in the vascular smooth muscles cause vasoconstriction whereas V2 receptors located on the tubular cells of the cortical collecting duct control the reabsorption of water via the kidneys. DI effects the renal mechanisms of the water reabsorption which is particularly imperative for maintaining body fluid osmolality. Edification that medication management is available in conjunction with readily accessible liquids at all times to replenish the enormous losses that occur through urination in addition to enforcement that this disease can easily turn to life threatening if not managed properly. PURPOSE STATEMENT: The principle of this article is to aide nurses and advanced specialty nurses in providing educational awareness to parents whom have a child with Diabetes Insipidus as it correlates with an insufficient response to the antidiuretic hormone (ADH).

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Rising to the Challenge of Nursing Education

As the nursing shortage and nursing faculty shortage continue, it is imperative that we look to innovative measures in order to increase the number of available baccalaureate prepared nurses. At the same time, it is crucial that we do not neglect the quality of education required to receive the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. This paper examines potential solutions to the ongoing nursing shortage.

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The Cost of Caring

Nurses care for individuals when they are most vulnerable and often serve as emotional outlets. It is this deep caring that can lead to nurses becoming burnt out or developing vicarious traumatization, secondary traumatic stress, or compassion fatigue. Awareness of these phenomena and methods of prevention needs to be increased throughout the profession. This includes teaching nursing students as they begin having interactions with patients in the clinical setting.

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The Birmingham VA Nursing Academy Partnership

This article describes a partnership and the importance of partnering with the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing as part of a pilot program in The United States to promote nursing careers in the VA hospital and to improve the quality of nursing education in the School of Nursing. Since it began, in 2009, this program, called the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy Partnership, has consistently performed beyond expectations to increase the breadth of knowledge for a select group of baccalaureate nursing students. Further it has created a strong connection between the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, a professional resource that benefits all students and faculty.

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Managing behavior in children with ASD

Unfortunately, many of these children end up in the emergency department for these behaviors due to the lack of community mental health services. These crises visits often times result in unnecessary medications being prescribed for these problematic behaviors.

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Love in the ICU

the love I have witnessed between people during my time as an ICU nurse

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One Day, One Shift, One Year

Nurse's experience of delivering a baby in the restroom of an ED.

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Not Just Another Day

Brief story about helping someone say goodbye and knowing their loved one was cared for.

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Self Examination of Body : An Effective Measure for Early Detection and Treatment Properly of Cancers among Girls/Women in Rural Area and Slum Area of India

Cancer is the one of the scariest and second largest non-communicable disease. It contributes a sizable in the total numbers of deaths. The World cancer Report, 2003 indicates that cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate globally and it would be increased by 50% new cases for the year 2020. In case of India the number is expected to rise seven million by 2015. Ignorance among the public, delayed diagnosis and lack of adequate medical facilities has given it the dubious distribution of being a ‘killer disease’. Only early diagnosis and properly treatment strategies can be prevented the one third of common cancers. It is the prime matter of concern that the female population at their reproductive age and beyond is badly infected by the disease. The incidence of breast cancer, cervix and ovarian cancer are raising steadily. There are several factors like life style and diets specially among urban women associated with this increasing rate of victimization. But among females of rural and urban slums it speaks another scenario because these female populations has a little scope of self examination of their body which is an effective strategy rather than education, awareness and screening test.

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True Suffering In An ICU

Essay concerning the view of various interactors in an ICU. Told from the perspective of a Professional therapeutic counselor who has counseled doctors, nurses, family, allied health and patients. Considers the suffering of all involved in the daily interactions of the ICU milieu.

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A Difficult Patient

managing a difficult patient in the PACU setting. In my nursing career, there are many different types of challenges. Job challenges, schedule challenges and patient related challenges. No matter what type of nursing I have encountered there are always difficult patients that test my nursing skills. Whether the demands are related to technical skill, assessment or cultural understanding, I enjoy that critical thinking that is required to rise to the occasion. As a seasoned nurse I feel that technical challenges have become easier to handle, while the social or cultural challenges have my increased interest. I continue to obtain as much education as I can to assist my nursing challenges.

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Teach Your Children CPR

CPR is a skill most anyone including our own children can learn. It is a skill that needs to be taught in all schools. We should not underestimate our youth being able to save someone's life by performing CPR.

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Eating Disorder among Elderly Causing Heart Attack in Post Retirement Life

In the era of globalization growing elderly faces multifaceted problems range from absence of ensured and sufficient income to support themselves and their dependents, to ill-health, absence of social security, loss of social role and recognition, and non-availability of opportunities for creative use of free time in all societies of India in their post retirement. In developed countries population ageing substantially shifted in social programmes.

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A Study To Exploring Nursing Students’ Lived Experiences In Pediatric Clinical Practice In A Selected College, Chennai

The results of this research can serve as a reference for nursing teachers to design appropriate courses for pediatric nursing curriculum.

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Receiving another patient helped save my other patient...

I started my day in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). I work the 7a-7p shift. It was just another routine day. I received an 84yr old female patient Mrs. R from the Main Operating Room (OR) who had undergone a Left Shoulder Replacement. Mrs. R received an interscalene block for pain in the OR and had general anesthesia. Since she was elderly and was not having good tidal volumes at the end of the case anesthesia decided to keep her on the ventilator a bit longer until she woke up more...

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Going Against the Norm: Treating Cancer as a Metabolic Disease

The current treatment for someone diagnosed with cancer is no longer acceptable. The focus needs to shift away from our standard treatments which so often causes pain as well as physical and emotional suffering. Emerging research about the body’s cellular metabolism provides new hope for cancer prevention and treatment. A number of mechanisms present in the human body are known to inhibit cancer cell growth by providing the body with an alternative fuel source, one that cancer cells cannot metabolize. For instance, induced ketosis offers a physiological means of regulating glucose metabolism in cancer patients while suppressing tumor metabolism and progression while ketone production significantly produces anti-cancer effects by shifting the body’s fuel source from a glucose dependency to one that is ketone based. Even while there remains controversy over the occurrence of many types of cancer, recent research has unveiled promising results towards cancer prevention and treatment. Emerging evidence indicates cancer is primarily a metabolic disease. According to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (2014) research is being done to look at the connection between body weight, sugar intake, insulin levels and their correlation to cancer. Understanding the cellular metabolism of cancer is necessary in order to find preventative and holistic treatment modalities and for this to occur, a paradoxical shift in our current perception of cancer treatment is necessary.

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Distracted Driving and Young People

Distraction while driving occurs any time you take your eyes off the road, your hands off the wheel, and your mind off your primary task: driving safely. There are three main types of distractions. Manual – removing your hands from the wheel Visual – removing your eyes from the road Cognitive – taking your mind off the complex task of driving. It is this last type of distraction – known as cognitive distraction– which appears to have the biggest impact on driving behavior especially for young drivers. Young drivers, for the purpose of this paper, will be defined as those ages 16-20. According to Distraction.gov (2013), “young drivers are 4 times more likely than any other age group to be involved in a crash while distracted”. They are also 44% more likely to text. 73% of those surveyed report driving while texting. This results in 23 times more likelihood of crashing. In fact, 16% of all distracted driving crashes involve drivers under 20. Crashes are the leading cause of death worldwide among those aged 15–29 years.

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Understanding behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorder

With the rising incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorders, nurses need to be educated regarding comorbidities that can cause aberrant behaviors. Along with a thorough medical assesment, finding mental health services can be challenging for many families. Many PCP's and other non-mental health professionals take on medication management of behaviors due to the lack of appropriate mental health resources.

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Post-Operative pain management in Total Joint Replacements: Finding a Balance

Post-operative pain can place patients at high risk for complications (Finding the balance continues)

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Authentic Leadership in Nursing

Authentic leadership, I choose this topic because it is what I aspire to be. I was treading on serious unfamiliar territory. I have never ventured upon this characteristic, but none the less; I want to be an authentic leader. I have been in the nursing world for over 20 years and have never met this strange and unfamiliar character called the quintessential “authentic leader”. I have worked with many different mangers in my career. I have noticed a common thread with each one .Leaders that were daily, dealing with emotional upheavals trying to balance their career and families. The stress from this unhappy medium; lead to mood swings and attitudes when they had a bad day. I remember as a staff nurse hiding behind curtains in my patient’s rooms to avoid the emotional outburst of my managers. This role of a leader all seemed frightening to me. I often wonder how this person is making a difference in patient care with such high levels of stress. I never had a good role model of a leader. But as I read the literature about authentic nursing leadership my spirit leaped and I could truly identify with the characteristics of this type of leader. This type of leader ventures out and takes risks and has a goal to exceed the standards of care; and is a trailblazer in the field of nursing. Authentic nursing leadership is multifaceted.

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Clinical Decision Support Need for Standardization

Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) is interactive software that assists physicians in decision-making about their patients. The system utilize data from pharmacy, laboratory, radiology, and other patient monitoring systems to help physicians in enhancing patient care. Statistics show an increase in the number of medical institutions adopting CDSS in pursuit of reducing errors, improving the nursing documentation and improving patient outcomes. This paper discusses errors arising from the use of CDSS and ways of preventing them.

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Educational Requirements for Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty: How do the States Differ?

Nursing shortages have plagued the United States for the past several decades. By 2020, the deficit of Registered Nurses (RN) is projected to exceed 1.2 million (AACN, 2012). One important factor is the shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Every year many qualified applicants are denied admission to nursing programs due to nursing faculty shortages (AACN, 2012). Nursing programs can only accommodate as many students as they have faculty to teach. State Boards of Nursing (SBN) throughout the country are collaborating with colleges and universities to fill nursing faculty vacancies utilizing a variety of creative strategies. An educational research team, at a private university in the Midwestern section of the country, examined each state’s SBN rules and regulations related to pre-licensure faculty requirements for baccalaureate nurse educators. The researchers found that there were vast differences in the educational requirements allowed by individual State Boards of Nursing for Baccalaureate nurse educators.

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The Hospital Room: Not Just Four Walls

The patient room is a place where patients and families learn about an illness and treatment plan, and where patients get better or worse. It is very important for nurses/nursing students to get a sense of the emotion that goes on in these rooms, the room is more than four walls.

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Advocacy for Those without a Voice: Helping Parents with Smoking Cessation

The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize current research in the area of second-hand smoke exposure in children and smoking cessation interventions for their parents.

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Women’s knowledge regarding preventive measures of Food Poisoning in Khartoum, Sudan

The objective of this article is to assess the mothers' knowledge regarding preventive measures of food poisoning in Khartoum. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study; it was conducted in Alemtidad area during period extended from September to December 2012, it involved 88 mothers selected by convenience. Data were collected by using designed questionnaire then analyzed by (SPSS). It was found that; mothers’ knowledge about preventive measures for food poisoning is satisfactory concerning; hand washing, washing vegetables and cooking appropriately. The economic status, level of education, and housing condition are not predicting factors influencing level of mothers’ knowledge about food poisoning. The mothers in Khartoum have acceptable level of knowledge about food poisoning. There is need for strengthening the situation through education sessions

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Dear Mr. R

If you could write a letter to that patient you just can't forget, what would you say?

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Making the Transition From Student to Working RN

Guidelines and tips for transitioning to working nurse and additional tips on surviving the first year.

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Let’s get rid of the “bad apples”

Let’s get rid of the “bad apples”

One of the most stressful challenges of the nurses working environment has become working among our own colleagues. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, and “Lateral Violence” are now included among our long list of stressful issues nurses face each and every day. These terms include behavior that is undesirable for any institution and is counterproductive in any environment. Undesirable behaviors can involve not only nurses but any employee in an institution including that administration. The effects it has on nursing can be detrimental to the entire profession and even cause many to leave the profession of nursing altogether. We must begin to address this issue with specific interventions and we must do it now for it can and will taint the image of nurses who are smiling at work, providing caring, compassion, and good rapport with their fellow colleagues and have an investment in the organization to do well.

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The Benefits of Keeping a Nursing Journal

Each day, nurses are playing a crucial role in someone’s life. They are a part of so many incredible stories and often they are not even aware of just how incredible their stories are and the impact these stories have on themselves, their patients, their own colleagues and their healthcare facilities. Most nurses will tell you that healthcare has changed drastically over the years and they probably would not say for the better. As nurses, we often practice in chaotic environments; one that is so vastly changing and one that is so hard to keep up with it. Keeping a nursing journal can not only put a voice to our unique nursing stories but can provide so many other benefits.

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Remember When We Were Nursing Students

Remember When We Were Nursing Students

I remember, as most nurses can, their days in nursing school, feeling anxious and scared going to clinical rotations to take care of real living patients and not just the mannequins in the lab. Most us can also recall how the floor nurses treated us as students engrossed in our clinical rotations. There were nurses who made a positive impression on us and unfortunately there were nurses who did not make a positive impression. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, “Vertical Violence” and “Internal Violence” have become too familiar in today’s nursing literature. As an Associate Professor of Nursing, it is a shame to have to include such terms in nursing lectures and worse of all trying to explain reasons this may be happening among nurses and just may happen to them as nursing students. According to Luparell (2011) “Because today’s student are tomorrow’s colleagues, conversations regarding incivility and bullying should include specific aspects of nursing academia and the preparation of new nurses”.

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No, Ms. Ray, I'm Not Thankful to Have a Job

Response to HR telling nurses they are lucky they have a job after cutting pay and benefits.

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Response to

Response to "I quit my RN job yesterday"

I have attempted to respond to an article written by Linda Ritter called "I quite my RN Job yesterday". It is a very moving article and wanted to give her my input an overall situation.

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A Thank You to Nurses

A brief look into the daily trials and joys of the intensive care unit.

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Mental Health Need Assessment Tool

Patient assessment is the first step in the nursing process. Assessing for mental illness is necessary in order to provide safe and competent care. Using a tool that incorporates Maslow's hierarchy of needs to assess if a patient feels that their needs are being met or not met is a good first step to begin assessing the mental health status of our patients.

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It Is Time to Openly Assess & Discuss Mental Illness

With the prevalence of mental illness on the rise, nurses in all healthcare settings are going to be tasked with providing care for patients with a mental disorder. Thus, it is necessary to provide nurses with the skills necessary to care for patients with mental illness.

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Managing wounds in the home

a brief article on wound care by caregivers in the home

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What do they expect? A comparison of student expectations and outcomes of undergraduate research experiences

The big challenges facing nursing students today have permanent effects on us all as patients. Nursing students need to be able to value the relevance, authority, and utility of nursing research for patient care through embedding research learning in both academic and practice-based settings. Students can be supported in learning how to access, understand, and appraise the authority of research through weaving these skills into enquiry-based learning. Furthermore, encouraging students to undertake research- based practice change projects can support research utilization and development skills.

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Our Responsibility at Tech-Savvy Nurses

With the advent of electronic charting in the workplace comes new challenges for nurses and medical professionals. As computer users, we can help make the transition easier for those nurses, nursing assistants and nursing students who are not as comfortable with technology. This article lists a few ways to do so.

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Effectiveness of Sexual Health Promotion in Adolescents

Effectiveness of Sexual Health Promotion in Adolescents

The authors illustrate the importance of sexual health promotion in the adolescent population through school-wide and community based efforts through a literature review composed of peer-reviewed, primary sources.

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Cortical Dynamics as a Therapeutic Mechanism for Touch Healing

Touch Healing (TH) therapies, defined here as treatments whose primary route of administration is tactile contact and/or active guiding of somatic attention, are ubiquitous across cultures. Despite increasing integration of TH into mainstream medicine through therapies such as Reiki, Therapeutic Touch,™ and somatically focused meditation practices such as Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, relatively little is known about potential underlying mechanisms. Here, we present a neuroscientific explanation for the prevalence and effectiveness of TH therapies for relieving chronic pain. We begin with a cross-cultural review of several different types of TH treatments and identify common characteristics, including: light tactile contact and/or a somatosensory attention directed toward the body, a behaviorally relevant context, a relaxed context and repeated treatment sessions. These cardinal features are also key elements of established mechanisms of neural plasticity in somatosensory cortical maps, suggesting that sensory reorganization is a mechanism for the healing observed. Consideration of the potential health benefits of meditation practice specifically suggests that these practices provide training in the regulation of neural and perceptual dynamics that provide ongoing resistance to the development of maladaptive somatic representations. This model provides several direct predictions for investigating ways that TH may induce cortical plasticity and dynamics in pain remediation.

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Effect of Evidence-Based Method Clinical Education on Patients Care Quality and Their Satisfaction

Nowadays, evidence-based education with a serious purpose, explicit and rational than the best current evidence to decision-making in nursing education has been addressed. This study aimed to assess the effect of clinical evidence based on the quality of patient care was performed Usual care based on traditional evidence-based care training has been under almost identical. Student feedback questionnaire data, patient satisfaction and quality of care were collected and then were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics. This study suggests that the use of evidence-based education in nursing care is not only effective as traditional education. But also knowledge and skills and promote high quality of care and the patient's hospital stay and costs were reduced.

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The Far Reaching Impact of a Child

Emergency care of pediatric patients leaves a deep impact to nurses career and lives. When these young lives are altered or end, how is the profession caring for the nurses left behind. This article explores the need for awareness and support during these trying times to return the nurse back to wellness.

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Alternative Treatments: Doubting Thomas to Believer

My experience with reiki therapy and how it forever changed my practice.

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Nurses And IELTS Exam

IELTS has been a fast growing organization over the years. I think It's expensive and it shouldn't be a requirement for nurses who want to work abroad. After all, most nurses know how to write, read, speak, and understand English.

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Care of the Pediatric Patient

Short exemplar about caring for a pediatric patient in Interventional Radiology

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