Entires with the tag 'Nursing' in the Journal of Nursing

Love hate relationship in nursing

Love hate relationship in nursing

My experience from a person who hated nursing to emerging as a qualified nurse.

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Nurses Eat Their Young; An Insight Into Systematic Hazing and its Implications on Patient Care

Nurses Eat Their Young; An Insight Into Systematic Hazing and its Implications on Patient Care

I am a nursing student that worked as a CNA for six years. I was inspired to write this from my own experiences that I have encountered while working in the field of nursing.

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Managing the Inevitability of Change

Managing the Inevitability of Change

Change is inevitable. Whether we are changing our minds, our clothes, or a channel on television, we know change happens… and we are fine with it, when we are the ones enacting it. However, what about when change happens to us? This article explores the effects of a hospital’s unit closing on staff – the good, the bad, and the ugly – and seeks to identify ways to mitigate the bad and ugly emotional responses, and hopefully explore means of increasing the good (by both hospital management practice, and individual mindset). A unit in one of south Florida leading hospital serves as a case study as we delve into this topic.

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The Calling - A Poem

The Calling - A Poem

Poem about nursing

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Post-Fall Care Nursing Algorithm

Post-Fall Care Nursing Algorithm

Post-Fall care practices are an integral aspect to patient care. As we care for older adults it is important to consider post-fall care practices.

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The Importance of Educating in Real-Time

The Importance of Educating in Real-Time

Working in the acute care hospital, provides many opportunities to learn. As healthcare workers, we must recognize and act quickly on any situation that puts a patient at risk. A recent situation occurred in the hospital that required both the need to act and to provide education in real-time.

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Attitude Matters

Attitude Matters

Even with a shared set of values and behaviors, we cannot underestimate the nurse’s attitude towards: others, their patients, their co-workers, and the organization they work for and towards the profession of nursing.

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Preparation of Faculty in the Era of Educational Technology

Preparation of Faculty in the Era of Educational Technology

While online nursing education programs are on the increase, faculty is constantly challenged to teach effectively in online environment. Preparation of nursing faculty in educational technology provides avenues for successful online teaching.

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Do Nurses Need Biology?

Do Nurses Need Biology?

As Biology instructors for nursing students, it is an honour to contribute to laying down a foundation in Biology for future nurses. One common question that has emerged among nursing students is “Why do I need to know Biology if I’m going to become a nurse?” We have wrestled with this question for some time. How does one generate an appropriate response to this question? How does one instill within a student the passion for learning Biology? How can one emphasize how valuable understanding Biology will become in the workplace? We hope to raise some interesting discussion and awareness about a topic that we have spent countless hours deliberating amongst ourselves and our colleagues.

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Beginnings of a Lifetime

Inspirational article about becoming a nurse and 38 years later.

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The Future of Nursing Education: Heading for a Major Crisis

Nursing as a practice and profession has experienced significant changes over the years. For instance, in the 1800s nurses were expected to be subservient to doctors. Just hear what the doctor who gave Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduation address: "Every nurse must remember that it is the attending physician's business to make a diagnosis of disease and hence that she should never hazard an opinion herself, under any circumstances." (Dr. Hooker, Springfield Hospital Annual Report, 1894). It would be interesting to know what the nursing faculty were thinking when they heard those words. Thankfully nurses during that era did not take the doctor’s advice and remained dedicated to advance and advocate for the profession of nursing. Around the same time that Springfield Hospital’s first nursing graduating class were listening to their graduation address, Florence Nightingale along with other nurse advocates, were making incredible strides to implement nursing education. After the Crimean War, Florence Nightingale recognized and introduced the need for formal nursing education but the education was limited to basic nursing knowledge and skills. As a result of the Women’s Rights Movement in the 1900s, the idea of nursing as a profession evolved into a reality. As society’s healthcare needs changed, nursing education had to change to meet those needs. There were however, challenges each century faced when trying to ensure nursing education met society’s needs and today, the challenges faced are heading right for a major crisis.

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The Forgotten Arm of Care

This article addresses the need for building a healthy work environment amidst the great emphasis on staffing to enhance care .

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DNP and the Transformational Leaders

Transitioning advanced nursing practice to the doctoral level represents the natural evolution of the nursing profession and the right moves to ensure that nurses are prepared for the highest level of practice. Many advocates within the health care community (local and national authorities) are calling and welcoming the DNP role. National and state agencies, as a leading advocate for advanced practice nursing, understands greatly the contributions APNs (advanced practice nurse) make in the health care system as cost-effective providers. In addition, APNs have identified the need for additional education in the areas of evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems management, among others (Kaplan & Brown, 2009). This transition in the education of advanced practice nurses (APNs) is targeted to meet the increasingly complex needs of patients, families, and communities in a rapidly changing health care environment. DNP education also has the potential to transform the nursing profession in a variety of ways. These include: • Creating and adopting new roles in nursing practice • Increasing the influence of APNs in health care and policy development • Promoting leadership by APNs in their workplace and health care organizations • Enhancing the self-concept of advanced practice nurses • Strengthening inter-professional relationships and collaborations. (Kaplan & Brown, 2009; Swider, Levin, Cowell, Breakwell, Holland, & Wallinder, 2009) The DNP stimulates the creation and adoption of new advanced practice role. As health care becomes more complex, it will take such strong leadership criteria for nurses in all fields to continue to improve their own standards and the qualifications of others in the field (Kaplan & Brown, 2009).

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Nursing School Angel

How a patient in nursing school taught me how to deal with life and death

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Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Many professions have long since realized that a vast divide exists between the classroom and real-world practice and, thus, have mandated transitional programs. Nursing lacks such an intermediate step as part of its professional training although new nurses are pressured to provide both safe and competent care to increasingly complex patients without any transitional support (Pittman, Herrera, Bass, & Thompson, 2013). To fill this gap many institutions have begun to implement their own nurse-residency programs [NRPs]. However, since not all institutions have introduced such transition-into-practice programs barriers must exist. Nationwide, NRPs are shrouded in confusion, false perceptions, and concerns that hinder their implementation. This manuscript was compiled to help shed light onto the reasons for the lack of implementation and provides evidence of the importance and overall benefits for such programs. Personal perspectives are also provided from the authors in order to gain a nursing-student perspective about these transitional programs.

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Successful Aging For Canada's LGBT Older Adults

A research paper I wrote for my BSN degree regarding how health care services, particularly nursing can accommodate older adult members of the LGBT community and provide safe and best practice care.

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Reflections of Nurse Educator

Teaching is an art. Some people are born teachers while others acquire the skill. To be a great teacher, one has to have a sense of humor and be very flexible. Teachers will never teach to gain monetary reward. However, they will teach to achieve the best reward - satisfaction that they have an impact on the education of the leaders of the world, the training of CEOs, and the success of new breed of professionals. Teaching is a noble profession.

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Is Nursing a Profession

Professions require that educational preparedness must be within institutions of higher learning. In order to be held out as a profession, an individual must be able to practice autonomously within their scope of practice. Nurses have an identified scope of practice mandated by a particular state board of nursing. A profession has a code of ethics which is recognized across numerous levels of practice within the profession. The culture and norms of a profession are easily recognized by the professionals who make-up the body.

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History of Ebola and Nursing

Many healthcare providers and the public are paying very special attention to the outbreak of the Ebola Virus in West Africa and the subsequent infection of the two critical care nurses at Texas. Many healthcare professionals expressed their confusion about the virus and the seeming stigmatization of nurses. Currently with the outbreak in Texas, nurses and other healthcare providers were encountered the same dilemmas as Central Africa nurses years ago.

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Bearers of Light

A poem about nurses. The bearers of light in the darkness of patients' lives.

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Rising to the Challenge of Nursing Education

As the nursing shortage and nursing faculty shortage continue, it is imperative that we look to innovative measures in order to increase the number of available baccalaureate prepared nurses. At the same time, it is crucial that we do not neglect the quality of education required to receive the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. This paper examines potential solutions to the ongoing nursing shortage.

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The Birmingham VA Nursing Academy Partnership

This article describes a partnership and the importance of partnering with the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing as part of a pilot program in The United States to promote nursing careers in the VA hospital and to improve the quality of nursing education in the School of Nursing. Since it began, in 2009, this program, called the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy Partnership, has consistently performed beyond expectations to increase the breadth of knowledge for a select group of baccalaureate nursing students. Further it has created a strong connection between the Birmingham VA Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing, a professional resource that benefits all students and faculty.

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A Study To Exploring Nursing Students’ Lived Experiences In Pediatric Clinical Practice In A Selected College, Chennai

The results of this research can serve as a reference for nursing teachers to design appropriate courses for pediatric nursing curriculum.

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Receiving another patient helped save my other patient...

I started my day in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). I work the 7a-7p shift. It was just another routine day. I received an 84yr old female patient Mrs. R from the Main Operating Room (OR) who had undergone a Left Shoulder Replacement. Mrs. R received an interscalene block for pain in the OR and had general anesthesia. Since she was elderly and was not having good tidal volumes at the end of the case anesthesia decided to keep her on the ventilator a bit longer until she woke up more...

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Authentic Leadership in Nursing

Authentic leadership, I choose this topic because it is what I aspire to be. I was treading on serious unfamiliar territory. I have never ventured upon this characteristic, but none the less; I want to be an authentic leader. I have been in the nursing world for over 20 years and have never met this strange and unfamiliar character called the quintessential “authentic leader”. I have worked with many different mangers in my career. I have noticed a common thread with each one .Leaders that were daily, dealing with emotional upheavals trying to balance their career and families. The stress from this unhappy medium; lead to mood swings and attitudes when they had a bad day. I remember as a staff nurse hiding behind curtains in my patient’s rooms to avoid the emotional outburst of my managers. This role of a leader all seemed frightening to me. I often wonder how this person is making a difference in patient care with such high levels of stress. I never had a good role model of a leader. But as I read the literature about authentic nursing leadership my spirit leaped and I could truly identify with the characteristics of this type of leader. This type of leader ventures out and takes risks and has a goal to exceed the standards of care; and is a trailblazer in the field of nursing. Authentic nursing leadership is multifaceted.

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Educational Requirements for Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty: How do the States Differ?

Nursing shortages have plagued the United States for the past several decades. By 2020, the deficit of Registered Nurses (RN) is projected to exceed 1.2 million (AACN, 2012). One important factor is the shortage of qualified nursing faculty. Every year many qualified applicants are denied admission to nursing programs due to nursing faculty shortages (AACN, 2012). Nursing programs can only accommodate as many students as they have faculty to teach. State Boards of Nursing (SBN) throughout the country are collaborating with colleges and universities to fill nursing faculty vacancies utilizing a variety of creative strategies. An educational research team, at a private university in the Midwestern section of the country, examined each state’s SBN rules and regulations related to pre-licensure faculty requirements for baccalaureate nurse educators. The researchers found that there were vast differences in the educational requirements allowed by individual State Boards of Nursing for Baccalaureate nurse educators.

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The Hospital Room: Not Just Four Walls

The patient room is a place where patients and families learn about an illness and treatment plan, and where patients get better or worse. It is very important for nurses/nursing students to get a sense of the emotion that goes on in these rooms, the room is more than four walls.

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Making the Transition From Student to Working RN

Guidelines and tips for transitioning to working nurse and additional tips on surviving the first year.

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The Benefits of Keeping a Nursing Journal

Each day, nurses are playing a crucial role in someone’s life. They are a part of so many incredible stories and often they are not even aware of just how incredible their stories are and the impact these stories have on themselves, their patients, their own colleagues and their healthcare facilities. Most nurses will tell you that healthcare has changed drastically over the years and they probably would not say for the better. As nurses, we often practice in chaotic environments; one that is so vastly changing and one that is so hard to keep up with it. Keeping a nursing journal can not only put a voice to our unique nursing stories but can provide so many other benefits.

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Remember When We Were Nursing Students

Remember When We Were Nursing Students

I remember, as most nurses can, their days in nursing school, feeling anxious and scared going to clinical rotations to take care of real living patients and not just the mannequins in the lab. Most us can also recall how the floor nurses treated us as students engrossed in our clinical rotations. There were nurses who made a positive impression on us and unfortunately there were nurses who did not make a positive impression. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, “Vertical Violence” and “Internal Violence” have become too familiar in today’s nursing literature. As an Associate Professor of Nursing, it is a shame to have to include such terms in nursing lectures and worse of all trying to explain reasons this may be happening among nurses and just may happen to them as nursing students. According to Luparell (2011) “Because today’s student are tomorrow’s colleagues, conversations regarding incivility and bullying should include specific aspects of nursing academia and the preparation of new nurses”.

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No, Ms. Ray, I'm Not Thankful to Have a Job

Response to HR telling nurses they are lucky they have a job after cutting pay and benefits.

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Response to

Response to "I quit my RN job yesterday"

I have attempted to respond to an article written by Linda Ritter called "I quite my RN Job yesterday". It is a very moving article and wanted to give her my input an overall situation.

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A Thank You to Nurses

A brief look into the daily trials and joys of the intensive care unit.

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What do they expect? A comparison of student expectations and outcomes of undergraduate research experiences

The big challenges facing nursing students today have permanent effects on us all as patients. Nursing students need to be able to value the relevance, authority, and utility of nursing research for patient care through embedding research learning in both academic and practice-based settings. Students can be supported in learning how to access, understand, and appraise the authority of research through weaving these skills into enquiry-based learning. Furthermore, encouraging students to undertake research- based practice change projects can support research utilization and development skills.

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Care of the Pediatric Patient

Short exemplar about caring for a pediatric patient in Interventional Radiology

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Do We Really Know Who Our Patients Are?

Do We Really Know Who Our Patients Are?

The profession of nursing has become so task orientated that we often forget to ask, "Who is our patient? ”What was their life like prior to becoming ill?" With advances in technology and the business atmosphere of healthcare nurses are often not able to provide patients with one of the most fundamental core competencies of nursing, caring.

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Be the Nurse you REALLY Want to Be

Be the Nurse you REALLY Want to Be

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National Nursing Licensure

National nursing licensure promotes more effective licensing than does state licensure by alleviating the ever-present nursing shortage and promoting mobility among the nursing workforce.

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Professional Nursing: Is A Doctorate Degree Necessary

Obtaining a higher education has transitioned from being a privilege to a prerequisite for professional success. However, success is not always correlated with the level of education the individual possesses. This is especially true in the field of nursing.

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Moral Distress in Nursing and Available Support Systems

Moral distress is a key issue facing nursing today; it affects the way nurses care for their patients and the number of nurses who stay in the profession (Gutierrez, 2005; Hamric & Blackhall, 2007).

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College of DuPage Opens Hospital Simulation Lab for Nursing Program

College of DuPage Nursing students are now learning how to respond to a wide variety of patient care experiences in the new Hospital Simulation Lab.

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The Reality of Diabetes in Rural Mexico: A Nursing Student Perspective

Students from six universities in Canada, Mexico, and the USA participated in a service learning exchange. In order to understand the needs of diabetes patients in rural Mexico three students from Canada and the USA trudged in the heat through the rough terrain to their homes. We used Omaha System signs/symptoms to collect interview data. The standardized language of the questionnaire allowed us to be aware of the interaction between traditional medical beliefs and the western medical model. Some of these challenges include maintaining the traditional family roles, controlling blood glucose levels without the appropriate medical equipment, and economic barriers. One patient was responsible for both caring for her eight young children and working in the fields to put food on the table. Additionally, she was in a constant hypoglycemic state causing her to faint in the fields. We also visited a visually impaired man that was distraught because he needed to rely on others for help in a machismo society. He said “While living in New York City, I was a victim of a robbery. I was so afraid because I thought I was going to die and as a result I got diabetes.” Though some may find this comment strange, it is a common theory among the rural population in Mexico. We will always remember the many Mexican speculate that eating bread absorbs the scare and thus prevents diabetes. This experience gave us a glimpse of the harsh reality that these people face everyday coping with diabetes.

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The Blessing: A Nurse’s Story

It was nine o’clock pm and I was walking briskly out of Recovery Room, knowing I had to be back the next day at six am. Though in a hurry, I purveyed the family waiting room to see if there were any visitors who needed help after the patient representative had gone home. I immediately noticed a lone woman with an anxious look on her face. As it turned out, her daughter-in-law had just been transferred to Intensive Care. Instead of waiting for one of our transporters, I decided to take her up myself. As we headed down the hall, she stated: “I bet you’re trying to leave, aren’t you?” I affirmed her observation. I added that, it was quite all right. We arrived at the particular ICU where her daughter-in-law was transferred, and upon talking with the patient’s RN, I was able to let her in right away. She turned to me and said: “Thank you; you will be blessed.”

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A Needed Change in Nursing

National nursing licensure promotes more effective licensing than does state licensure by alleviating the ever-present nursing shortage and promoting mobility among the nursing workforce. Some of the many benefits of a national nursing licensure include improved patient access to quality nursing care, enhanced discipline and information sharing among the states, physical and electronic provision of care by competent nurses, and convenience of employers to more mobile and competent nurses.

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American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Brings its National Nurse Leadership Skill-building Program to Texas

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) expands its hospital-based nurse leadership and innovation training program to a fourth region with the addition of eight Austin-area hospitals. AACN Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy is designed to empower bedside nurses as clinician leaders and change agents whose initiatives measurably improve the quality of patient care with bottom-line impact to the hospital.

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UN Noticed 

it takes more than the knowledge of degrees can provide. It takes the UN noticed hero, our nursing assistant.

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The Power of Preceptorship 

The Power of Preceptorship 

The clinical experience is an essential component to nursing education. The identification of formal preceptors grows increasingly difficult as competition for clinical sites and nursing faculty shortages continue to place a strain on the system.

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The new meaning of the word “STAT” 

the word “STAT” and what it means to me compared to what it means to others. In this instance it was sort of a “Hurry up and wait” affair.

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Providing Appropriate Nursing Care for the Developmentally Disabled Child 

Developmental disabilities are birth defects related to a problem with how body parts and/or body systems work. These defects may affect multiple body parts and/or systems. There are four types of disability discussed in this article including nervous system disability, sensory-related disability, metabolic disorders and degenerative disorders.

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Nursing with a Movement Disorder...DYSTONIA 

Oddly enough, my professional journey through medicine intersected with a personal medical condition… one that would remain undiagnosed and untreated for five years. Some doctors said that my facial tics (hemifacial spasms) and strange pains with twisting of limbs were due to stress or some hysterical "woman's disease." Yes, we're talking this century.

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Nursing Summer Camp: Recruiting the Next Generation of Nurses!

This manuscript looks at providing a nursing summer camp to school aged children with the hopes of sparking interest in the profession at a young age, as well as fostering the nursing spirit in children who may be considering the profession.

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Nursing Students Readying to Save Lives 

Recognizing the findings in a patient with an impending myocardial infarction (MI) and intervening appropriately is essential for healthcare providers in improving patient outcomes.

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Mythology 

Article pertaining to mythology as related to nursing and the RN student.

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My Nursing Career A Whole New Appreciation 

My Nursing Career A Whole New Appreciation 

Not a day goes by, without reading in the newspaper and hearing over the radio or TV about the rising rate of unemployment in our country. It is this reality that has given me a whole new appreciation for being a nurse.

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Looks Can Be Deceiving 

I asked his family to step out for a moment so I could empty his JP drains. I emptied them into a basin and I noticed that they were very dark. I inspected them a little closer and I noticed it had a greenish tinge to it. Remembering what the surgeon had said about the possibility of a bowel perforation I got concerned and called the surgeon.

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IS THERE CARE IN HEALTH CARE 

I wrote this poem after going out one day to assist a mother with her 22 year old son who had a traumatic brain injury in a 4-wheeler accident. He had a trach, feeding tube, foley cath and skin breakdown from being in a long term care facility for 2 months. The insurance company allowed me three visits to teach the mother how to care for her son.

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Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 

Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 

Research shows that turnover rates are high for new nurse graduates as a result of a stressful work environment coupled with inadequate support during the transition from student to professional practice. This article seeks to define the problem of new nurse graduate retention, examine strategies implemented by specific organizations that decreased turnover rates of new graduate nurses, and offer recommendations for the new graduate nurse about to enter professional practice.

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I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 

I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 

Time and time again changes were thrust on us and made to sound as if they were the answers to all our problems, when, in reality, they created more problems and basically cured nothing.

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How Personal Digital Assistants Can Increase the Quality of Nursing Care Provided in the Hospital Setting 

Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), tools that have the potential to help nurses increase the quality of care that they provide in the hospital setting.

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Culturally Competent Nursing in Homecare 

Culturally Competent Nursing in Homecare 

Homecare nurses must be culturally aware in order to appropriately care for homecare patients. Culture plays a part in the care of all types of patients but it plays a more important role in homecare.

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Conflict Resolution 

Conflict Resolution 

Conflict Resolution Tools For Nursing in the RN Journal

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Conducting Nursing Research 

Evidence-based research by nursing professionals has played a major role in the advances of medical technology.

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Change for the Best 

There have been many changes in nursing in the almost thirty years since I graduated.

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Challenges in Nursing Informatics

Challenges in Nursing Informatics

As the use of technology explodes into the health care industry, its effects have the potential to become destructive elements to the nursing profession. This paper will discuss the evolution of nursing documentation, the immergence of health information technology, and the challenges it creates for the nursing profession.

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Can I Depend On You? 

an LPN Instructor at East Central Technical College in Douglas, Georgia requires an experience for her nursing students.

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Are New Graduate Nurses Being Taught About the Importance of Nursing Rounds? 

This study helps to determine if new graduate nurses have any knowledge about nursing rounds and if they are using nursing rounds as a way to organize their practice.

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Are Changing Demographics Influencing the Trend of Nursing Curricula in Massachusetts BSN Programs? 

An RN Journal article -a nursing student was interested to know why, with the rapidly growing population of older Americans, there was not a stand alone course related to the care of the geriatric patient offered within her SON curriculum. What were the barriers that failed to allow a stand-alone course for geriatrics?

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