Violence Journal of Nursing

Fostering Sound Relationships in Nursing Education Through Faculty and Student Mentoring

Fostering Sound Relationships in Nursing Education Through Faculty and Student Mentoring

Tags: ethical principles ethics mentorship nursing ethics nursing faculty nursing students perioperative stress students violence

This article will provide a brief review of the literature on the benefits of effective mentoring such as improvement in the confidence level of novice nursing faculty members that leads to success as a teacher. This article will also provide an overview of some types of mentoring programs currently available. Further, this article will examine the importance of mentoring as it relates to enhancing the student-faculty relationship. Lastly, this article will examine ethical standards and the faculty member's role in promoting a just culture between the student, their peers, and the faculty member in the learning environment.

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Women and Homelessness

Women and Homelessness

Tags: Case Study homeless homelessness violence women

Women and homelessness is a great concern that affects the global policy and health determinants to improve health. This case study is a glimpse of the cultural class as it revolves around the lives of mostly White homeless mothers, attending to both everyday lives and cultural norms while exploring and interpreting their interdependencies.

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Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Tags: decreasing costs Floating graduates improving patient care new graduate nurses nursing nursing school nursing students patient care student perspectives violence

Many professions have long since realized that a vast divide exists between the classroom and real-world practice and, thus, have mandated transitional programs. Nursing lacks such an intermediate step as part of its professional training although new nurses are pressured to provide both safe and competent care to increasingly complex patients without any transitional support. To fill this gap many institutions have begun to implement their own nurse-residency programs [NRPs]. However, since not all institutions have introduced such transition-into-practice programs barriers must exist. Nationwide, NRPs are shrouded in confusion, false perceptions, and concerns that hinder their implementation. This manuscript was compiled to help shed light onto the reasons for the lack of implementation and provides evidence of the importance and overall benefits for such programs. Personal perspectives are also provided from the authors in order to gain a nursing-student perspective about these transitional programs.

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Let’s get rid of the “bad apples”

Let’s get rid of the “bad apples”

Tags: behavior bullying Incivility Lateral Violence leadership nursing leadership organizational Intervention stress violence

One of the most stressful challenges of the nurses working environment has become working among our own colleagues. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, and “Lateral Violence” are now included among our long list of stressful issues nurses face each and every day. These terms include behavior that is undesirable for any institution and is counterproductive in any environment. Undesirable behaviors can involve not only nurses but any employee in an institution including that administration. The effects it has on nursing can be detrimental to the entire profession and even cause many to leave the profession of nursing altogether. We must begin to address this issue with specific interventions and we must do it now for it can and will taint the image of nurses who are smiling at work, providing caring, compassion, and good rapport with their fellow colleagues and have an investment in the organization to do well.

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Remember When We Were Nursing Students

Remember When We Were Nursing Students

Tags: clinical clinical rotations nursing school nursing students stress student students violence

I remember, as most nurses can, their days in nursing school, feeling anxious and scared going to clinical rotations to take care of real living patients and not just the mannequins in the lab. Most us can also recall how the floor nurses treated us as students engrossed in our clinical rotations. There were nurses who made a positive impression on us and unfortunately there were nurses who did not make a positive impression. Terms such as “Incivility”, “Bullying”, “Vertical Violence” and “Internal Violence” have become too familiar in today’s nursing literature. As an Associate Professor of Nursing, it is a shame to have to include such terms in nursing lectures and worse of all trying to explain reasons this may be happening among nurses and just may happen to them as nursing students. According to Luparell (2011) “Because today’s student are tomorrow’s colleagues, conversations regarding incivility and bullying should include specific aspects of nursing academia and the preparation of new nurses”.

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Hurray for the Millennial Nurses!

Hurray for the Millennial Nurses!

Tags: bullying education graduates horizontal violence Nurse Educator violence work environment

This article discusses horizontal violence in the field of nursing and how we as educators can provide them with the skills to create a more civil work environment.

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Reducing Lateral Violence: A humanistic educational approach

Reducing Lateral Violence: A humanistic educational approach

Tags: bullying education Lateral Violence new graduate nurses reducing violence teaching violence

We’ve all witnessed it: the gossip, backbiting, and bullying that too often occurs in the nursing workplace. Lateral violence (LV), also known as horizontal violence or workplace bullying, consists of behaviors including “bullying, intimidation, sarcasm, back-stabbing, criticism, exclusion, and various forms of unequal treatment”. LV has been a topic of ongoing topic of concern in nursing for many years and is particularly prevalent in female dominated professions. LV is often attributed to oppression theory, which states that nurses are an oppressed group because they are deemed less important than others (such as medical practitioners); therefore, nurses often lack autonomy and control over their profession which results in powerlessness and displaced aggression towards other nurses.

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