Latest Entries Journal of Nursing

Using Emotional Intelligence to Combat Nurse Bullying

Using Emotional Intelligence to Combat Nurse Bullying

Tags: bullying conflict resolution emotional intelligence mindfulness

Nurse bullying and incivility is an epidemic happening in all settings, including among nursing leaders. Many nurses admitted to being bullied in the workplace. The American Nurses Association defines nurse bullying as "repeated, unwanted harmful actions intended to humiliate, offend and cause distress in the recipient," calling it "a very serious issue that threatens patient safety, RN safety, and the nursing profession as a whole." Bullying and incivility contribute to decreased employee and patient satisfaction scores, increased nurse turnover rates, psychological and physical distress, and a lack of motivation and engagement. Bullying can be overt, such as verbal criticism, name-calling, and insults. Indirect bullying can be rumors, gossip, and sabotage.

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Enuresis

Enuresis

Tags: behavioral interventions child Enuresis literature review treatment options

This article review covers enuresis and the behavioral factors that predict the severity of the disease as well as treatment responses. Medical and behavioral interventions, as well as limitations of the study, are discussed.

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Value of a Bachelor’s Educated Nurse

Value of a Bachelor’s Educated Nurse

Tags: bsn degrees Nurse Education nursing education RN to BSN

Whether one is a recent graduate of an associate degree in nursing program or an experienced nurse who wishes to explore other opportunities in nursing. It is a good time to consider enrolling in a RN to BSN program and complete the BSN degree in nursing. In many cases, a BSN will open the door to opportunities in management, quality improvement, or be the first step in obtaining a Master of Science degree in nursing. In addition, some medical centers that hold Magnet recognition from the American Nurses' Credentialing Center (ANCC) require nurses to either have a BSN or begin school to obtain a BSN.

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Promoting Respect and an Environment of Civility in the Classroom

Promoting Respect and an Environment of Civility in the Classroom

Tags: behavior education emotional intelligence learning Nurse Education nursing faculty nursing students respect respectful behavior teaching

Educators today can attest to the lack of student respect shown in their classes. A lack of respect is a form of incivility. Since returning to in-person learning, respect has taken a nosedive. In fact, most of us have witnessed an increase of incivility in all walks of life. The question is, what to do about it? At a community college in upstate NY, the School of Nursing, Health & Wellness also noted a lack of respect displayed among students. The lack of respect was an issue the school felt strongly needed to be addressed. This prompted the creation of a Respect Committee with representatives from the Nursing Program, the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program and the Exercise and Human Performance Program to address the issue of student disrespect. To address the issue, the committee sent out a brief confidential survey to faculty and staff to investigate the prevalence of student disrespect, the facultys’ comfort with addressing student disrespect and established strategies for faculty to help guide them to promote a respectful environment for both teaching and learning.

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Enhancing Nursing Assistant Curriculum: Incorporating Strategies to Speak Up for Safety

Enhancing Nursing Assistant Curriculum: Incorporating Strategies to Speak Up for Safety

Tags: advocacy assertiveness communication nursing assistant patient safety

Nursing Assistants are non-licensed clinical staff who, despite being directly involved in patient care, may be reluctant to call out safety concerns because of their position within the clinical hierarchal structure. The current nursing assistant training curriculum provides basic instruction on communication and teamwork skills, however, does little to reinforce the importance of the nursing assistant’s role, or empower these staff to bring safety concerns forward. This reluctance to speak up may result in unaddressed safety issues and patient harm.

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The Subtle Art of Connecting with Patients: Lessons Learned from a Seasoned Diabetes Nurse

The Subtle Art of Connecting with Patients: Lessons Learned from a Seasoned Diabetes Nurse

Tags: connecting with patients diabetes diabetic patients

The thing about patients is that they are humans filled with feelings. Even the ones who appear tough and stoic on the exterior; sometimes they're the hardest. Every patient is a person, a person who has decades of life experience. Just because we are trained in Nursing, doesn't automatically give us license to be authorities. You have to earn it. You have to earn that trust. You have to listen, really hear, and pay very close attention. There is a distinct art to inviting people to relate to you, and to enable them to trust you with their healthcare, their vitality, their life. It's a gift when you can connect with a patient. It is an honour. At the end of the shift after truly helping a person, a Nurse can hold their head high and know that they've made a difference. That's the sweet spot, that's the altruism of making a difference.

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What’s the Deal With Being Unprepared?  Patient’s Should Know...

What’s the Deal With Being Unprepared? Patient’s Should Know...

Tags: cardiac emergency emergency department emergency room ER experiences

My husband has had 2 chest pain events within a week. As a nurse working primarily in cardiac nursing most of my career, I knew that any family member entering the arena of chest pain treatment would bear the wrath of my watchful eye. This has been An eye-opening, untoward (in my opinion), experience and an experience that can become a learning moment for many, as my skilled eye in emergency room settings can cause “jading” of an experience, but the perception should carry forward.

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Let’s Look Back, at TEAM Nursing!

Let’s Look Back, at TEAM Nursing!

Tags: nursing assistant patient care patient identification Team Nursing

Team nursing while working as a new nurse meant 3 sets of eyes on our patient load. The RN was required to start I.V.’s, take off doctors’ orders and administer I.V. push medication, but the RN was ENGAGED directly in patient care under this style of nursing! The nursing assistant and the RN worked side-by-side to provide outstanding care to the patient without the RN (myself, in this example), feeling chained to the medication cart and having the feeling that taking time out for patient care would make me late for a medication pass. Perhaps other nurses in my era didn’t appreciate this style of nursing care, but in more recent days, primary nursing is the paradigm.

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