Latest Entries Journal of Nursing

A nursing-driven approach towards reducing hypertension: a focus on evening dosing and circadian rhythm

A nursing-driven approach towards reducing hypertension: a focus on evening dosing and circadian rhythm

Tags: Antihypertensives blood blood pressure Chronotherapy hypertension hypertensive medication treatment

There are increasing data supporting evening administration as a means of achieving better BP control through re-establishing normal sleeping dipping patterns, thereby preventing the development of comorbidities. Additionally, this dosing change has been shown to prevent the morning surge, a precursor to negative cardiovascular (CV) events, including heart attack and stroke. When the costs are high both fiscally and medically, simple and cost-free interventions should be the first-line treatments.

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Opposite of Burnout is Engagement

Opposite of Burnout is Engagement

Tags: burnout career engagement working nurse

Facing a pandemic brought many nurses to a feeling of burnout, while this nurse was brought to engagement.

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Migraine verses Bell’s Palsy: A Case Study

Migraine verses Bell’s Palsy: A Case Study

Tags: Bell’s Palsy Case Study Migraine

Understanding the difference between migraine headaches and Bell’s Palsy will help drive appropriate care and treatment options for improved outcomes and a more rapid recovery.

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Pyelonephritis:  A Review of Literature

Pyelonephritis: A Review of Literature

Tags: diagnosis infection kidney kidney infection literature review Pyelonephritis urinary tract infection UTI

Pyelonephritis needs to be diagnosed early so proper treatment can be instituted to prevent further complications. If urinary tract infection is left untreated, it can spread to the blood stream.

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So ARE Nurses the “Nurse Police” When it Comes to Inpatient Hospital Stays?

So ARE Nurses the “Nurse Police” When it Comes to Inpatient Hospital Stays?

Tags: cardiac cardiac nursing diet heart healthy diets inpatient care

This essay explains my experience with working with patients who face new dietary changes, in the form of heart-healthy diets, specifically. I explore my experience with acting in a sense, as a monitor of what my patient eats while hospitalized, monitoring food brought in by family and/or friends at the time of their visit, and how nurses should seek out teaching moments for imminent dietary changes their patients will face upon discharge home.

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Using Emotional Intelligence to Combat Nurse Bullying

Using Emotional Intelligence to Combat Nurse Bullying

Tags: bullying conflict resolution emotional intelligence mindfulness

Nurse bullying and incivility is an epidemic happening in all settings, including among nursing leaders. Many nurses admitted to being bullied in the workplace. The American Nurses Association defines nurse bullying as "repeated, unwanted harmful actions intended to humiliate, offend and cause distress in the recipient," calling it "a very serious issue that threatens patient safety, RN safety, and the nursing profession as a whole." Bullying and incivility contribute to decreased employee and patient satisfaction scores, increased nurse turnover rates, psychological and physical distress, and a lack of motivation and engagement. Bullying can be overt, such as verbal criticism, name-calling, and insults. Indirect bullying can be rumors, gossip, and sabotage.

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Enuresis

Enuresis

Tags: behavioral interventions child Enuresis literature review treatment options

This article review covers enuresis and the behavioral factors that predict the severity of the disease as well as treatment responses. Medical and behavioral interventions, as well as limitations of the study, are discussed.

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Value of a Bachelor’s Educated Nurse

Value of a Bachelor’s Educated Nurse

Tags: bsn degrees Nurse Education nursing education RN to BSN

Whether one is a recent graduate of an associate degree in nursing program or an experienced nurse who wishes to explore other opportunities in nursing. It is a good time to consider enrolling in a RN to BSN program and complete the BSN degree in nursing. In many cases, a BSN will open the door to opportunities in management, quality improvement, or be the first step in obtaining a Master of Science degree in nursing. In addition, some medical centers that hold Magnet recognition from the American Nurses' Credentialing Center (ANCC) require nurses to either have a BSN or begin school to obtain a BSN.

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