Entires with the tag 'Nurse' in the Journal of Nursing

Factors Influencing Nurse Medication Errors

Factors Influencing Nurse Medication Errors

This article explores the medication errors and the phenomena of nurse distractions. Nurses are intimately involved in the medication administration process. Even though the parameters of selection, dosing, compounding, and dispensing medication remain under the purview of other allied health professionals, the nurse represents the last safety checkpoint between the medication and the patient and efforts should be directed toward removing obstacles which are negatively impacting this process. It has long been suspected that nursing distractions whether by patient, family, coworkers or others, are facilitating the occurrence of errors in the hospital setting. There are practices which are discussed which may ameliorate this threat to some extent if employed consistently and judiciously.

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Let Volunteers Answer The Call

Let Volunteers Answer The Call

How volunteers take pressure off of Nurses

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Current and Future Educational Challenges for the Nurse Educator

Current and Future Educational Challenges for the Nurse Educator

This article explores current trends in nursing education.

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"Just a nurse"

Being a nurse is sufficient...think outside of the box

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Are Canadian Nurse Practitioners here to stay?

Are Canadian Nurse Practitioners here to stay?

This paper outlines articles that take a closer look into the role of NPs in the Canadian health care system, and how their roles have evolved in response to an ever-changing health care environment.

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Views of a New Graduate Nurse: The Value of Mentorship

Views of a New Graduate Nurse: The Value of Mentorship

A brief overview of one nurse's struggles as a new graduate nurse and the importance of improving the working environment for new nurse graduates.

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Disparities in Healthcare: Night Shift Nurses

Disparities in Healthcare: Night Shift Nurses

Night shift nurses have been shown more likely to developing health issues than their day shift counterparts. Research over the past twenty years has led to the increasing conclusion that working night shifts for as little as eight shifts a month is associated with an increased likelihood to develop metabolic syndrome, a four-fold increase in the incidence of vascular events, and an increased chanceofdeveloping certain cancers.

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It is Time to Recruit More Men into the Profession of Nursing

It is Time to Recruit More Men into the Profession of Nursing

It is a benefit to have men working in the profession of nursing. We need to recruit more men into our nursing schools and to work in our healthcare institutions. Both male and female nurses bring different perspectives and benefits to the profession of nursing and to the patient’s they care for. The ability of men to negotiate and obtain higher salaries and positions in both administration and nursing specialty areas may serve as the impetus to elevate the entire nursing profession.

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Quiet Servant

Quiet Servant

A poem dedicated to the service of community health nurses.

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Reflections of Nurse Educator

Teaching is an art. Some people are born teachers while others acquire the skill. To be a great teacher, one has to have a sense of humor and be very flexible. Teachers will never teach to gain monetary reward. However, they will teach to achieve the best reward - satisfaction that they have an impact on the education of the leaders of the world, the training of CEOs, and the success of new breed of professionals. Teaching is a noble profession.

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Prescriptive Authority for Nurse Practitioners

The physician shortage in primary care, plus the growth of nurse practitioners and increasing need for access to health care, creates a necessity for more autonomous nurse practitioners. However, current restrictions on nurse practitioners, particularly prescription regulations for controlled substances, limit what practitioners can do for patients. These restrictions also increase wait times for patients and have the potential to increase liability claims as physicians prescribe medications for patients they have not adequately evaluated. Nurse practitioners have proven to be a safe, quality, and cost saving approach to primary care. To meet the growing needs for patients, nurse practitioners must have the ability to prescribe controlled substances in all 50 states.

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PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS AFFECTING EATING HABITS AMONG NURSES IN GENERAL HOSPITAL

Abstract Background: Obesity and overweight are more frequent in workers working in shift and psychological distress increased among working women in Malaysia. A supportive manager and a flexible working time are linked with a decrease of the conflicts between family and work. Objectives: The purpose of the research was to investigate the patterns of eating habit and its relationship factors, with focus on psychological factor among nurses. Methods: A study of 100 nurses was conducted in medical-surgical wards of a public hospital. Data was collected using a cross sectional study using a convenience sampling (non probability). A self-administered questionnaire on eating habits was used, and analyzed using SPSS (version 21). Results: A majority of (89%) participants was from a female group while a number of male participants are only (11%). Majority (86%) responded they ate because of feeling happy followed by eating because of feeling lonely (80%) and most of them did not perceived that they have a healthy eating habits (53%). Conclusions: The findings indicated that employers need to identify physical workload that is acceptable to avoid risks of unhealthy eating habits and monitor the availability of healthy food in the worksite. Keywords: Eating habits,Psychological Factors, working in shifts.

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Rising to the Challenge of Nursing Education

As the nursing shortage and nursing faculty shortage continue, it is imperative that we look to innovative measures in order to increase the number of available baccalaureate prepared nurses. At the same time, it is crucial that we do not neglect the quality of education required to receive the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. This paper examines potential solutions to the ongoing nursing shortage.

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Making the Transition From Student to Working RN

Guidelines and tips for transitioning to working nurse and additional tips on surviving the first year.

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Applying Ethical Standards to the Assessment of Pain

Applying Ethical Standards to the Assessment of Pain

A nurse's role and responsibility is to ensure that our patient(s) receive adequate care and our assessments are comprehensive and thorough. One of the methods of assisting with pain assessment is applying ethical standards.

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Do nurses really understand Advanced Health Care Directives?

As a Nursing Supervisor, I have witnessed many problems associated with patients Advanced Health Care Directives (AHCD). On many occasions, patients are asked about AHCD when their medical condition worsens, leaving education of AHCD lacking and often put to the family to make end-of-life decisions. Both nurses and patients have verbalized not understanding AHCD. At the local hospital not only have many nurses acknowledged not understanding their role and responsibility about AHCD, but they also do not really have a good understanding themselves of what AHCD are; therefore, they do not feel comfortable educating patients and families about this vital healthcare issue. Research shows that providing AHCD education is effective in changing not only the treatment preferences of patients, but their attitudes toward end-of-life health care (AHRQ, 2003). There was an eminent need to look into this problem at the local community hospital.

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Literature Review: Safe Nurse Staffing

The purpose of this literature review is to exam nurse staffing and staffing related issue and its impact on the healthcare world. Safe nurse staffing poses substantial issues at the clinical level including its tremendous impact on patient mortality, patient satisfaction, increased incidence of medical errors, and nurse dissatisfaction and burnout.

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“What is it with you?”

“I’ve got a fainter here!” I call over my sister’s head to the flight attendant. My sister is sitting in the aisle seat, I am in the middle, and my new patient is sitting by the window. He has just announced to me that he doesn’t feel well and thinks he may faint

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Implication of Foreign-Educated Nurses on United States Nursing Collegiality

The United States (U.S.) has repeatedly experienced a shortage of qualified registered nurses, a situation, which is capable of deteriorating further in view of the U.S. aging population (Clark, Stewart, & Clark, 2006).

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Nurse/Patient Communication Twenty Suggestions for Improvement

From time to time, physicians are taken to task by fellow physicians and many others for a variety of shortcomings in the practice of their profession. Common among the listed faults is a lack of effective communication with their patients.

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My Professional Path as a Nurse

When I was a little girl, I’ve always been fascinated to see nurses in white uniform. I have this inner desire that nursing is something that I really wanted to do. Eventually, I enrolled in the nursing program and finished my degree. I started working in medical area and I learned that to be a nurse you have to be caring, patient, integrity, intelligent, have a compassionate and listening ear, and always seek knowledge for advancement.

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American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Brings its National Nurse Leadership Skill-building Program to Texas

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) expands its hospital-based nurse leadership and innovation training program to a fourth region with the addition of eight Austin-area hospitals. AACN Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy is designed to empower bedside nurses as clinician leaders and change agents whose initiatives measurably improve the quality of patient care with bottom-line impact to the hospital.

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There Are No Simple Cases 

As a twenty year experienced recovery room nurse, I know that no case is ever the same. People are individuals. They react differently to medications. They metabolize drugs at different rates depending on age, body mass, body temperature, kidney and liver functions. Although everyone is different, I can basically expect a certain outcome in recovering people. But in saying this, you can always expect the unexpected.

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Smoking Cessation Education in the Elderly 

The role of the professional nurse as direct care provider and educator is pivitol in providing clients with the information and support necessary to facilitate smoking cessation and improve client health outcomes.

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Russian Nurses after the Crimean War 

As it is well known, the Crimean War (1854-1856) marked the turning point in the history of nursing. The outstandingly self-sacrificing work of Florence Nightingale and 38 British nurses, who worked day and night in Turkish hospitals, providing help and necessary care to the sick and wounded soldiers, was highly praised and acknowledged in Britain. Their hard labor and efficient management in improving sanitary conditions in the army hospitals brought about a new approach to women’s participation in hospital care.

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Relationships among the Elderly: The Effects on One’s Health and Psychosocial Well Being 

Advances in medicine are allowing many adults to live longer lives than previous generations. In fact, the elderly population is becoming one of the largest growing sectors of the present population. Recently, researchers have begun studying what factors contribute to successful aging. These studies are showing that the impact of family and social relationships plays an important part in one’s health and psychosocial well being.

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Recognizing and Overcoming Toxic Leadership 

Recognizing and Overcoming Toxic Leadership 

Toxic nurse managers are detrimental to organizations, diminishing staff morale, thwarting creativity, and creating unnecessary job stress. Toxic nurse managers can also negatively affect an organization’s bottom line as staff absenteeism may increase, job satisfaction and critical thinking may decrease, leading to turnover and complicating innovation, decision making, and problem solving.

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Preventing Falls in the Elderly Long Term Care Facilities 

The elderly long-term care population is at increase risk for falls and fall related injuries. The implementation of a fall prevention program is important for ensuring resident safety. Systematically assessing residents’ risk for falls and implementing appropriate fall prevention interventions can reduce the number of falls in the elderly long-term care residents.

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Pressure Ulcers Management 

Pressure ulcers are a major complication associated with the loss of mobility, activity, increased moisture, poor nutrition, friction, shear, and altered sensory perception. They are caused by unrelieved compression of the blood vessels and tissues resulting in the lymphatic system not filtering waste products.

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Pharmaceutical Counseling 

1.5 million Americans are sickened, injured or killed by medication errors each year; seniors most at risk due to the polypharmacy risk factor. Adding pharmaceutical counseling to patients on four or more medications decreases the risk of medication errors

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Pathogen Transmission from Blood Pressure Cuffs 

Pathogen Transmission from Blood Pressure Cuffs 

Decades of research has been conducted regarding the transmission of pathogens in hospitals from patient to patient, patient to staff, and staff into the community.

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Memories from a Haitian Cholera Treatment Center 

In January and February of this year I worked in Haiti with United States NDMS DMAT and ImSurt teams providing medical and surgical care to the victims of the January 12th earthquake. What I experienced during those weeks only partially prepared me for what I would experience upon my return to Haiti

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Master vs. Apprentice 

It has come to my recent attention that there is a large deficit in mentoring new graduate nurses as they enter the workforce. The development of healthy working relationships for new graduate nurses is something that is overlooked. Everyone had to have that first day on the unit or in the office when they felt scared and vulnerable. I ask you now to reflect back on your first day and how you were treated.

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Managing Diabetic Patients on Dialysis: The Nurse and Practitioners Role in Multidisciplinary Team Essentials 

The chronic state of diabetes mellitus (DM) mainly type II, is an increasingly common cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in all countries, accounting for 51% of dialysis patients in the U.S. and 39% in Europe. Patient survival is much worse than for non-diabetic patients, with a large proportion of patients dying within the first 3 months of dialysis (excluded from USRDS data). In North America, chronic diabetes (e.g., poorly controlled), has shown as a major cause of death associated with cardiovascular diseases. Usually the outcome is better for transplanted patients.

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Keeping a Positive Outlook: My Clinical Experience as a Student Nurse 

Keeping a Positive Outlook: My Clinical Experience as a Student Nurse 

My experience in my senior year clinical preceptorship was without a doubt unique but I feel its uniqueness was in what I made of it, something every nursing student can do for themselves. If there is one lesson to gain from reading about my experiences it should be that the success of a clinical, whether a preceptorship or group experience, is entirely what the student makes of it.

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Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 

Increasing New Graduate Nurse Retention from a Student Nurse Perspective 

Research shows that turnover rates are high for new nurse graduates as a result of a stressful work environment coupled with inadequate support during the transition from student to professional practice. This article seeks to define the problem of new nurse graduate retention, examine strategies implemented by specific organizations that decreased turnover rates of new graduate nurses, and offer recommendations for the new graduate nurse about to enter professional practice.

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I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 

I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 

Time and time again changes were thrust on us and made to sound as if they were the answers to all our problems, when, in reality, they created more problems and basically cured nothing.

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I AM DEDICATING THIS POEM TO ALL THE NURSES 

I WAS MERELY TWENTY SOMETHING, WHEN I STARTED MY CAREER. NURSING WAS MY DREAM AND NOW IT IS MY FEAR

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Help Me Get Better 

A Registered Nurse reflects on her experiences as an RN professional!

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First Day of Kindergarten 

Camera hanging off my neck, I prance from my car toward the playground. CRASH! THUD! POW! Right in front of the drop off zone a three car accident has unfolded before my eyes. Ella's preschool teacher, Mrs. Lewis, looks at me and declares, "Go, Cara. You're the nurse."

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Female R.N.’s: You May Be Working for Less Pay than Your Male Counterparts 

Although CRNP’s and PA’s are comparable at the most basic of levels, more is expected of CRNP’s because we are licensed to do more! What we cannot do is work a 50 hour week for a 40 hour paycheck! So why do we continue to the right thing for less pay?

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Family Presence During CPR in the Emergency Department 

Family Presence During CPR in the Emergency Department 

A descriptive survey conducted in 2000 (Myers, et al 2000) investigated attitudes and beliefs of patients’ families and ER staff members about FWR. The survey reported that 98% of patients’ families indicated that they had a right to be present and would do it and would participate in FWR again; 100% of family members said that FWR was helpful to them, and 95% said it was helpful for the patient. It also showed that 70% of professionals surveyed after their participation in FWR actually produced a higher level of “professional” behavior along with a more “professional” bedside dialog amongst the health care team. The survey also indicated that having the family in the resuscitation room prompted the staff to take the patient’s dignity, privacy, and need for pain management into greater consideration when compared to an un-witnessed resuscitation effort. (Myers, et al 2000)

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Examining the Transition for New Graduate Professional RN 

Transition into the role of the professional nurse is cause for great excitement and apprehension for the student nurse. As a soon to be BSN graduate, this author noted a similar theme amongst classmates which provided an opportunity for inquiry to highlight key strategies for successful transition for the entry-level professional nurse

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End-Of-Life-Care: Are Nurses Educationally Prepared? 

End Of Life Care study in the RN Journal. Are nurses prepared to offer quality end-of-life care to patients and families?

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Clinical Nursing: Keeping Your Skills In-Tune 

The primary duty of every nurse is the assessment of a patient’s physical and emotional well-being. This basic-skill learned in the very first nursing class is the one skill and primary duty the nurse will use every day with his and/or her patients.

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Clinical Nurse Leadership and Performance Improvement on Surgical Unit 

Clinical Nurse Leadership and Performance Improvement on Surgical Unit 

There are many ways that nurses can prevent harm to their patients one method is to provide the necessary care that will promote only positive outcomes for their patients.

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Background of Assessment for the Registered Nurse and the Clinical Practitioner 

The evaluation of impairment from the kidneys, as with the findings of proteinuria or an increased serum creatinine concentration, may be your first premises in the investigation pending diagnose. In addition, rushing to a conclusion can present as a variety of clinical syndromes. In other instances, the presentation may reflect the impact of impaired renal function on other organ systems, such as edema or shortness of breath resulting from renal salt retention.

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Are New Graduate Nurses Being Taught About the Importance of Nursing Rounds? 

This study helps to determine if new graduate nurses have any knowledge about nursing rounds and if they are using nursing rounds as a way to organize their practice.

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ACUTE RENAL FAILURE 

Acute renal failure (ARF) has become increasingly common in patients with critical illnesses. Up to two-thirds of intensive care unit (ICU) patients develop ARF with the leading cause being sepsis. Treatment of ARF has been associated with higher costs and the following adverse outcomes: increased length of stay, excess mortality of 30-71%, need for chronic dialysis in the patients who survive, and the requirement of discharge to short-term or long-term care facilities.

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A Lesson Learned 

I wanted to say something brilliant. I wanted to make it better. I had nothing to say. Instead, I put my arms around this tiny woman and I held her close. Her head rested on my shoulder as she sobbed for her losses. In that moment in time, there were no call lights, no medications, and no other important matters. There was no longer any urgency as I held this woman.

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A Comet in Siberia 

A brief glimpse of the causes and effects of the remarkable journey of the British Nurse Kate Marsden into Siberia in 1891.

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