Entires with the tag 'Care' in the Journal of Nursing

Case Study: A Systematic Approach to Early Recognition and Treatment of Sepsis

Case Study: A Systematic Approach to Early Recognition and Treatment of Sepsis

The term sepsis is often misunderstood. The public and often healthcare workers are unaware of the severity and high mortality rates this infection process has upon the world. Sepsis has vague symptoms that make diagnosis difficult. Often, sepsis is diagnosed in the later stages, when more obvious yet severe symptoms occur. This case study discusses a female who presents to the emergency department with sepsis secondary to pneumonia. Over the course of three days, the patient’s health quickly deteriorates, demonstrating the rapid progression of sepsis. Clinical findings, such as vitals signs, lab abnormalities, and symptoms of sepsis are discussed. The term bundle of care is presented to educate the reader on the golden standard of care for treatment of sepsis. This case study intends to increase community awareness and education to health care providers as well as providing an evidenced-based treatment guideline. More education and raised awareness will help prevent a deadly yet treatable infectious process.

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Nurses Eat Their Young; An Insight Into Systematic Hazing and its Implications on Patient Care

Nurses Eat Their Young; An Insight Into Systematic Hazing and its Implications on Patient Care

I am a nursing student that worked as a CNA for six years. I was inspired to write this from my own experiences that I have encountered while working in the field of nursing.

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Post-Fall Care Nursing Algorithm

Post-Fall Care Nursing Algorithm

Post-Fall care practices are an integral aspect to patient care. As we care for older adults it is important to consider post-fall care practices.

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Building Trusting Work Relationships in Healthcare and Beyond

Building Trusting Work Relationships in Healthcare and Beyond

In an effort to help leaders in various types of healthcare organizations learn how to build trust and strong work relationships within their organizations, eight chief nursing officers (CNOs) from healthcare organizations throughout California were interviewed. All the CNOs were asked the same structured questions. A review and analysis of those interviews revealed the following five dimensions as key ingredients: authenticity, work ethics, communicating and sharing news, history and reputation, and creating a supportive and empowering environment. Our results include the definitions of trust by the eight CNOs, the Four R’s of building trustworthy relationships and an acronym of SHARE. We discuss what CNOs describe as “trust blockers,” actions a CNO can take that would break the employee’s trust. The results of this research can be used in a variety of ways including incorporating them into leadership development training aiming at strengthening their personal leadership styles and improving workplace environments by creating and role modeling a more open communication culture.

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Six Sigma and Healthcare Finances

Six Sigma and Healthcare Finances

This article is a brief primer on Six Sigma methodology and its impact on healthcare finance and nursing.

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Bedside Reporting: Embracing the Need for Clinical Change

Bedside Reporting: Embracing the Need for Clinical Change

Communication is an integral part of nursing care. The implementation of bedside reporting practices provides an avenue for best practices and improved outcomes.

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Beginnings of a Lifetime

Beginnings of a Lifetime

Inspirational article about becoming a nurse and 38 years later.

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Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Improving Patient Care While Decreasing Costs: The Benefits, Barriers, and Student Perspectives on Nurse Residency Programs

Many professions have long since realized that a vast divide exists between the classroom and real-world practice and, thus, have mandated transitional programs. Nursing lacks such an intermediate step as part of its professional training although new nurses are pressured to provide both safe and competent care to increasingly complex patients without any transitional support (Pittman, Herrera, Bass, & Thompson, 2013). To fill this gap many institutions have begun to implement their own nurse-residency programs [NRPs]. However, since not all institutions have introduced such transition-into-practice programs barriers must exist. Nationwide, NRPs are shrouded in confusion, false perceptions, and concerns that hinder their implementation. This manuscript was compiled to help shed light onto the reasons for the lack of implementation and provides evidence of the importance and overall benefits for such programs. Personal perspectives are also provided from the authors in order to gain a nursing-student perspective about these transitional programs.

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True Suffering In An ICU

True Suffering In An ICU

Essay concerning the view of various interactors in an ICU. Told from the perspective of a Professional therapeutic counselor who has counseled doctors, nurses, family, allied health and patients. Considers the suffering of all involved in the daily interactions of the ICU milieu.

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Care of the Pediatric Patient

Short exemplar about caring for a pediatric patient in Interventional Radiology

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Funding Health Care as a Basic Human Right

The United States of America is a nation known and heralded worldwide for its democracy, freedom, and wealth. Through our commerce, we have become a prosperous nation. Through our commonalities we stand united. Through our shared citizenship, we establish our community. Through our voices, we are heard. So why is it, our nation has been divided against the idea of health care being funded as a basic human right? U.S. Senator, Ted Kennedy, once said,

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Doing More with Less: Are We Compromising Patient Care?

I came bustling into the Medical-Surgical unit at the hospital where I work as scheduled. It was the third 12-hour shift I was working, so I was really looking forward to getting the shift over with and enjoying the upcoming four days off. I was expecting to come onto the floor to find the usual nurses on the unit.

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American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Brings its National Nurse Leadership Skill-building Program to Texas

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) expands its hospital-based nurse leadership and innovation training program to a fourth region with the addition of eight Austin-area hospitals. AACN Clinical Scene Investigator (CSI) Academy is designed to empower bedside nurses as clinician leaders and change agents whose initiatives measurably improve the quality of patient care with bottom-line impact to the hospital.

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Providing Appropriate Nursing Care for the Developmentally Disabled Child 

Developmental disabilities are birth defects related to a problem with how body parts and/or body systems work. These defects may affect multiple body parts and/or systems. There are four types of disability discussed in this article including nervous system disability, sensory-related disability, metabolic disorders and degenerative disorders.

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Preventing Falls in the Elderly Long Term Care Facilities 

The elderly long-term care population is at increase risk for falls and fall related injuries. The implementation of a fall prevention program is important for ensuring resident safety. Systematically assessing residents’ risk for falls and implementing appropriate fall prevention interventions can reduce the number of falls in the elderly long-term care residents.

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Nursing with a Movement Disorder...DYSTONIA 

Oddly enough, my professional journey through medicine intersected with a personal medical condition… one that would remain undiagnosed and untreated for five years. Some doctors said that my facial tics (hemifacial spasms) and strange pains with twisting of limbs were due to stress or some hysterical "woman's disease." Yes, we're talking this century.

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Nursing Summer Camp: Recruiting the Next Generation of Nurses!

This manuscript looks at providing a nursing summer camp to school aged children with the hopes of sparking interest in the profession at a young age, as well as fostering the nursing spirit in children who may be considering the profession.

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Nursing Students Readying to Save Lives 

Recognizing the findings in a patient with an impending myocardial infarction (MI) and intervening appropriately is essential for healthcare providers in improving patient outcomes.

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My Nursing Career A Whole New Appreciation 

My Nursing Career A Whole New Appreciation 

Not a day goes by, without reading in the newspaper and hearing over the radio or TV about the rising rate of unemployment in our country. It is this reality that has given me a whole new appreciation for being a nurse.

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Missionary to Haiti 

On January 28th I started out on the treck to head to Haiti. Living in Honduras I found myself traveling through Miami, to get to Chicago, to head out to Haiti. But, as there were few choices of air transportation to Haiti, we took whatever we could get. Upon arrival into Haiti, the first thing that hit me was the sea of humanity. This little town held 4 million people. Keeping things in perspective, I am living in a country of 7 million people – so over half of the population of Honduras resides in the city of Port-au-Prince. We drove to our camp site, Quisqueya Christian School (QCS). We immediately found a “spot” on the grass, set up our tents, and got to the business of preparing ourselves for the tasks ahead of us.

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Memories from a Haitian Cholera Treatment Center 

In January and February of this year I worked in Haiti with United States NDMS DMAT and ImSurt teams providing medical and surgical care to the victims of the January 12th earthquake. What I experienced during those weeks only partially prepared me for what I would experience upon my return to Haiti

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Maximizing Pain Relief in Pediatric Patients 

Pain management is a complex issue that has become increasingly significant in the nursing profession; so much so that the assessment of pain has become known as the fifth vital sign. This issue becomes even more crucial when attempting to manage pain in pediatric patients.

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Managing Diabetic Patients on Dialysis: The Nurse and Practitioners Role in Multidisciplinary Team Essentials 

The chronic state of diabetes mellitus (DM) mainly type II, is an increasingly common cause of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in all countries, accounting for 51% of dialysis patients in the U.S. and 39% in Europe. Patient survival is much worse than for non-diabetic patients, with a large proportion of patients dying within the first 3 months of dialysis (excluded from USRDS data). In North America, chronic diabetes (e.g., poorly controlled), has shown as a major cause of death associated with cardiovascular diseases. Usually the outcome is better for transplanted patients.

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Making a Difference: Recognizing the Risk of Alcohol and Benzodiazepine Use by Older Women 

Substance abuse in the elderly, specifically abuse of alcohol and benzodiazepines, is much higher than most people may think. According to a recent article published by CNN, of the 25.6 million women over the age of 59, seven percent abuse alcohol and eleven percent abuse psychoactive drugs such as benzodiazepines (CNN, 1998).

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Looks Can Be Deceiving 

I asked his family to step out for a moment so I could empty his JP drains. I emptied them into a basin and I noticed that they were very dark. I inspected them a little closer and I noticed it had a greenish tinge to it. Remembering what the surgeon had said about the possibility of a bowel perforation I got concerned and called the surgeon.

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Keeping a Positive Outlook: My Clinical Experience as a Student Nurse 

Keeping a Positive Outlook: My Clinical Experience as a Student Nurse 

My experience in my senior year clinical preceptorship was without a doubt unique but I feel its uniqueness was in what I made of it, something every nursing student can do for themselves. If there is one lesson to gain from reading about my experiences it should be that the success of a clinical, whether a preceptorship or group experience, is entirely what the student makes of it.

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IS THERE CARE IN HEALTH CARE 

I wrote this poem after going out one day to assist a mother with her 22 year old son who had a traumatic brain injury in a 4-wheeler accident. He had a trach, feeding tube, foley cath and skin breakdown from being in a long term care facility for 2 months. The insurance company allowed me three visits to teach the mother how to care for her son.

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I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 

I Quit My RN Job Yesterday 

Time and time again changes were thrust on us and made to sound as if they were the answers to all our problems, when, in reality, they created more problems and basically cured nothing.

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I AM DEDICATING THIS POEM TO ALL THE NURSES 

I WAS MERELY TWENTY SOMETHING, WHEN I STARTED MY CAREER. NURSING WAS MY DREAM AND NOW IT IS MY FEAR

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How Personal Digital Assistants Can Increase the Quality of Nursing Care Provided in the Hospital Setting 

Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), tools that have the potential to help nurses increase the quality of care that they provide in the hospital setting.

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Help Me Get Better 

A Registered Nurse reflects on her experiences as an RN professional!

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Exploring Communication Technology In the Family Birthing Center

Technology is being used increasingly in the health care field in order to improve patient outcomes. An e-health nursing initiative has been set forth by the Canadian Nurses Association to direct the development of information and communication initiatives. Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (2009) defines e-health as, "The leveraging of information and communication technology to enhance professional practice in order to promote and facilitate the health and well-being of individuals and families.” The purpose of the article is to explore ways in which communication technology in particular can aid nurses in providing more effective care, and allow for an enhanced health outcome.

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End-Of-Life-Care: Are Nurses Educationally Prepared? 

End Of Life Care study in the RN Journal. Are nurses prepared to offer quality end-of-life care to patients and families?

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Distress and Depression Among Bone and Marrow Transplant Patients 

Bone and Marrow Transplant (BMT) is a five step treatment process: screening, collecting, conditioning, infusion, and engraftment. Bone and marrow transplant treatment is very aggressive that creates significant physical, social, psychological, and emotional stress. During the treatment process, many BMT recipients experience and display a wide array of psychosocial disorders including distress, anxiety, and depression. The way an individual experiences and copes with the distress, anxiety, and depression contributes to the physiological, psychological, and psychosocial outcomes of BMT treatment.

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DETOUR OFF THE SEPSIS ROAD EARLY RECOGNITION IS KEY 

At present, the US reports approximately 750,000 cases of sepsis a year and estimates 1 million cases by 2020 With a mortality rate of 30%, an estimated 250,000 annual deaths, and hospital costs exceeding $16 billion, sepsis has become a burden. It is imperative to increase the awareness and early recognition of sepsis

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Culturally Competent Nursing in Homecare 

Culturally Competent Nursing in Homecare 

Homecare nurses must be culturally aware in order to appropriately care for homecare patients. Culture plays a part in the care of all types of patients but it plays a more important role in homecare.

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Clinical Profiling: Natural History of Essential Hypertension 

Hypertension is a major cardiovascular risk factor that directly contributes to myocardial episodes such as abnormal wall motion, hypertrophies, and subsequently an infarction (MI). Also noted, are cerebrovascular accidents (CVA), congestive heart failure (CHF), peripheral arterial insufficiency (PAI), and premature mortality. Optimal and cost-effective management of the condition depends on careful diagnosis, treatment minimization, and optimized adherence to the selections of tests and treatment plans.

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Clinical Nursing: Keeping Your Skills In-Tune 

The primary duty of every nurse is the assessment of a patient’s physical and emotional well-being. This basic-skill learned in the very first nursing class is the one skill and primary duty the nurse will use every day with his and/or her patients.

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Change for the Best 

There have been many changes in nursing in the almost thirty years since I graduated.

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Challenges in Nursing Informatics

Challenges in Nursing Informatics

As the use of technology explodes into the health care industry, its effects have the potential to become destructive elements to the nursing profession. This paper will discuss the evolution of nursing documentation, the immergence of health information technology, and the challenges it creates for the nursing profession.

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Caregiver Role Strain due to Bipolar Disorder in Children 

Bipolar Disorder article about the Caregiver's role and the family dynamics associated with the disease.

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Can I Depend On You? 

an LPN Instructor at East Central Technical College in Douglas, Georgia requires an experience for her nursing students.

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Are New Graduate Nurses Being Taught About the Importance of Nursing Rounds? 

This study helps to determine if new graduate nurses have any knowledge about nursing rounds and if they are using nursing rounds as a way to organize their practice.

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ACUTE RENAL FAILURE 

Acute renal failure (ARF) has become increasingly common in patients with critical illnesses. Up to two-thirds of intensive care unit (ICU) patients develop ARF with the leading cause being sepsis. Treatment of ARF has been associated with higher costs and the following adverse outcomes: increased length of stay, excess mortality of 30-71%, need for chronic dialysis in the patients who survive, and the requirement of discharge to short-term or long-term care facilities.

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A Lesson Learned 

I wanted to say something brilliant. I wanted to make it better. I had nothing to say. Instead, I put my arms around this tiny woman and I held her close. Her head rested on my shoulder as she sobbed for her losses. In that moment in time, there were no call lights, no medications, and no other important matters. There was no longer any urgency as I held this woman.

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